Textbook+Ch-2+Exercise+Scan - 54 SIGNALS AND SIGNAL SPACE...

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Unformatted text preview: 54 SIGNALS AND SIGNAL SPACE title(’Amplitude of {\it D}_{\it n}') subplot(212) ;sZ=stem( [—N:N] ,angle(D) ); set(52, ’Linewidth’ ,2); ylabel(’<{\it D}__{\it n} ’ ); tit1e(’Angle of {\it D}_{\it n}'); REFERENCES 1. P. L. Walker, The Theory of Fourier Series and Integrals, Wiley-Interscience, New York, 1986. 2. R. V. Churchill, and J. W. Brown, Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems, 3rd ed., McGraw- Hill, New York. 1978. PROBLEMS 2.1-1 Find the energies of the signals shown in Fig. P2.1—l. Comment on the effect on energy of sign change, time shift, or doubling of the signal. What is the effect on the energy if the signal is multiplied by k? Figure P.2.‘l -l 1" sint 2.1-2 (a) Find EX and Ey, the energies of the signals x(t) and y(t) shown in Fig. P2.l—2a. Sketch the signals x(t) + y(l) and x(t) — y(t) and show that the energy of either of these two signals is equal to Ex + Ey. Repeat the procedure for signal pair in Fig. P2.1—2b. (b) Now repeat the procedure for signal pair in Fig. P2.1—2c. Are the energies of the signals x(t) + y(t) and x(t) — y(r) identical in this case? 2.1-3 Find the power of a sinusoid C cos (wot + 6). 2.1-4 Show that if col = mg, the power of g(t) = C1 cos(a)1! + 61) + C2 cos(w2t + 02) is [C12 + C22 + 201 C2 cos(91 — 92)]/2, which is not equal to (C12 + C22)/2. 2.1-5 Find the power of the periodic signal g(t) shown in Fig. P2. l-5. Find also the powers and the rms values of (a) —g(t) (b) 2g (1‘) (c) eg (1:). Comment. 2.1-6 Find the power and the rms value for the signals in (a) Fig. P2-l-6a; (b) Fig. 2.16; (c) Fig. P2- 1 —6b; (d) Fig. P2.7-4a; (e) Fig. P2.7-4c. Problems 55 ‘V Figure P.2.'I -2 x(t) ya) l 1 2 0 1 t—> 0 2 1—) —1 (a) x(t) 1 2n: 0 n t_) (b) x(t) 0 yt 1 1 TC 0 n/4 t_) (c) 0 1: t—> Figure P.2.'l -6 2.1-7 Show that the power of a signal g(t) given by n g“) = Z Dkeiwkt wi aé wk for all i 75 k k=m is (Parseval’s theorem) n Pg = Z le12 k=m 56 SIGNALS AND SIGNAL SPACE 2.1-8 Determine the power and the rms value for each of the following signals: (a) 10 cos (1001 + (d) 10 cos 5: cos 10; (b) 10 cos (100: + + 16 sin (15m + (e) 11) sin 5: cos 10; (c) (10 + 2 sin 3t) cos 101‘ (f) 6"” cos wot 2.2-1 Show that an exponential e‘” starting at ——00 is neither an energy nor a power signal for any real value of a. However, if a is imaginary, it is a power signal with power Pg 2 l regardless of the value of a. 2.3-1 In Fig. P2.3—l, the signal g1(t) = g(—t). Express signals g2(z), g3 (t), g4(t), and g5 (I) in terms of signals g(t), g1(t), and their time-shifted, time-scaled, or time-inverted versions. For instance, g2 (t) = g(t — T) +g1(t — T) for some suitable value of T. Similarly, both g3(t) and g4(t) can be expressed as g(t — T) + g(t ~— T) for some suitable value of T. In addition, g5 (t) can be expressed as g(t) time-shifted, time—scaled, and then multiplied by a constant. Figure P.2.3-'l 82(1) 1 o z—> 1 2 1.5 33“) 84(1) 85“) 1 1 t.) —1 [0 t—>1 _L o L 0 1—» 2 2 2 2.3-2 For the signal g(t) shown in Fig. P2.3-2, sketch the following signals: (a) g(—t); (b) g(t + 6); (C) g(3t); (d) g(6 - I)- Figure P.2.3-2 2.3-3 For the signal g(t) shown in Fig. P2.3-3, sketch (3) g(t — 4); (b) g(t/ 1.5); (c) g(2t — 4); (d) g(2 — t). Hint: Recall that replacing t with t — T delays the signal by T. Thus, g(2t — 4) is g(2t) with t replaced by t — 2. Similarly, g(2 — t) is g(—t) with I replaced by t —— 2. 23-4 For an energy signal g(t) with energy Eg, show that the energy of any one of the signals —g(t), g(——t), and g(t — T) is Eg. Show also that the energy of g(at) as well as g(at — b) is E g / a. This shows that time inversion and time shifting do not affect signal energy. On the other Problems 57' Figure P.2.3-3 hand, time compression of a signal by a factor a reduces the energy by the factor a. What is the effect on signal energy if the signal is (a) time—expanded by a factor a (a > 1) and (b) multiplied by a constant a? 2.3-5 Simplify the following expressions: tan t sin 7r(t + 2) (a) (ztz +1>5(t) (d) 5U — 1) ja) —- 3 cos (m) (b) (w2+9)8(a)) (e) (1+2 )6(2t+3) (c) [e-tcos (3t — n/3)] 30 +11): (0 (S‘nwkw) 8(a)) Hint: Use Eq. (2.10b). For part (1') use L’Hospital’s rule. 2.3-6 Evaluate the following integrals: (a) ffooo g(t)8(t — m1: (e) [33 5(3 + oe-t d1 (b) [gauge—0dr (r) , [32(t3+4)a(1—t)dt (c) [3°00 8(t)e‘j“" dr (g) 3°00 g<2 — 06(3 — t) dt (d) flee so — 2) sin 7nd: (h) [3°00 (206-1) cos got — 5)6(2x — 3) dx Hint: 8(x) is located atx = 0. For example, 8(1 — t) is located at 1 — t = 0; that is, at t :11; and so on. 2.3-7 Prove that 8(at) = Lac) WI Hence show that 1 8(a)) = $80”) where a) = 21f Hint: Show that 00 1 / meson) dt = HMO) » 2.4-1 Derive Eq. (2.19) in an alternate way by observing that e = (g—c x), and M2 = (g— cx) - (g — cx)=1gl2 +£le2 — 2cg - x To minimize lelz, equate its derivative with respect to c to zero. 2.4-2 For the signals g(t) and x(t) shown in Fig. P2.4—2, find the component of the form x(t) contained in g(t). In other words, find the optimum value of c in the approximation g(t) % cx(t) so that the error signal energy is minimum. What is the resulting error signal energy? 58 SIGNALS AND SIGNAL SPACE Figure P.2.4-2 Figure P.2.4-4 x(t) (a) (b) 2.4-3 For the signals g(t) and x(t) shown in Fig. P2.4—2, find the component of the form g(t) contained in x(t). In other words, find the optimum value of c in the approximation x(t) % cg (I) so that the error signal energy is minimum. What is the resulting error signal energy? 2.4-4 Repeat Prob. 2.4-2 if x(t) is a sinusoid pulse shown in Fig. P2.4_-4. 2.4-5 The Energies of the two energy signals x(t) and y(t) are E x and Ey, respectively. (a) If x(t) and y(t) are orthogonal, then show that the energy of the signal x(t) + y(t) is identical to the energy of the signal x(t) — y(t), and is given by Ex + Ey. (b) ifx(t) and y(t) are orthogonal, find the energies of signals c1x(t) + c2y(t) and 01x0?) — czy(t). (c) We define Exy, the cross-energy of the two energy signals x(t) and y(t), as 00 Exy 2/ x(!)y*(t)dt —00 If z(t) = x(t) :l: y(t), then show that it EZ = Ex +Ey :1: (EW +5”) 2.4-6 Let x10) and x20) be two unit energy signals orthogonal over an interval from t = t1 to t2. Signals x1 (t) and x2 (1‘) are unit energy, orthogonal signals; we can represent them by two unit length, orthogonal vectors (X1, x2). Consider a signal g(t) where 80) = 611610) + C2x2(t) £1 < t 3 t2 This signal can be represented as a vector g by a point (c1, Q) in the x1 —— x2 plane. (a) Determine the vector representation of the following six signals in this two—dimensional vector space: (iv) 84(1): X10) + 2x20) (V) £50) = 2x10) +X2(t) (vi) 5'60) = 3x10) 0) g1(t) = 2x10) — x2(t) (ii) g2(t) = —x1(l) + 2x20) (iii) g3 (t) = —xz(t) (b) Point out pairs of mutually orthogonal vectors among these six vectors. Verify that the pairs of signals corresponding to these orthogonal vectors are also orthogonal. f "4 7. .l. 1', Figure 9.2.5-1 Problems 59 2.5-1 Find the correlation coefficient c,, of signal x(t) and each of the four pulses g1 (t), g2 (t), g3 (t), and g4(t) shown in Fig. P2.5-1. To provide maximum margin against the noise along the transmission path, which pair of pulses would you select for a binary communication? (a) g1(t) (b) (c) 1 sin 4m —sin 2m 1 t —> 0 l —> z —> 2.7-1 (3) Sketch the signal g(l) = t2 and find the exponential Fourier series to represent g(t) over the interval (—1, 1). Sketch the Fourier series goo”) for all values of t. (b) Verify Parseval’s theorem [Eq. (2.68a)] for this case, given that 001 7T4 272E n=l n 2.7-2 (3) Sketch the signal g(t) = l and find the exponential Fourier series to represent g(t) over the interval (—7r, 71). Sketch the Fourier series go(t) for all values of t. (b) Verify Parseval’s theorem [Eq. (26821)] for this case, given that 2.7-3 If a periodic signal satisfies certain symmetry conditions, the evaluation of the Fourier series coefficients is somewhat simplified. ’ (a) Show that if g(t) = g(—t) (even symmetry), then the coefficients of the exponential Fourier series are real. (b) Show that if g(t) = —g(—t) (odd symmetry), the coefficients of the exponential Fourier series are imaginary. (c) Show that in each case, the Fourier coefficients can be evaluated by integrating the periodic signal over the half-cycle only. This is because the entire information of one cycle is implicit in a half-cycle owing to symmetry. Hint: If ge (t) and go (2) are even and odd functions, respectively, of t, then (assuming no impulse or its derivative at the origin), a 2a a / 39(1) (11‘ = / ge(t) dz and / g0(l) dt = O —a 0 —a 60 SIGNALS AND S|GNAL SPACE Also, the product of an even and an odd function is an odd function, the product of two odd functions is an even function, and the product of two even functions is an even function. 2.7-4 For each of the periodic signals shown in Fig. P2.7—4, find‘ the exponential Fourier series and sketch the amplitude and phase spectra. Note any symmetric property. ‘ Figure P.2.7-4 1 mil at... *ZO‘E —101t #‘N 11 lOrl: 207E t a 2.7 -5 (a) Show that an arbitrary function g(t) can be expressed as a sum of an even function ge (t) and an odd function g0 (t): g0) = ge(t) + go(t) . 1 1 Hmt: gm = E[g<r) + g<—r>] + 5[g(t> — g(—r)] —v—__—I —,—/ geU) 800) Problems 61 (b) Determine the odd and even components of the following functions: (i) u(t); (ii) e_a’u(t); (iii) e” . 2.7-6 (a) If the two halves of one period of a periodic signal are of identical shape except that one is the negative of the other, the periodic signal is said to have'a half-wave symmetry. If a periodic signal g(t) with a period T 0 satisfies the half-wave symmetry condition, then g (t — = -g(t) In this case, show that all the even-numbered harmonics (coefficients) vanish. (b) Use this result to find the Fourier series for the periodic signals in Fig. P2.7—6. Figure P.2.7-6 (a) (b) 1-) 2.8-1 A periodic signal g(t) is expressed by the following Fourier series: 2 g(t) = 35in t+cos <3; — + 2cos(8t+ %) (a) By applying Euler’s identities on the signal g(t) directly, write the exponential Fourier series for g (t). (b) By applying Euler’s identities 0n the signal g (t) directly, sketch the exponential Fourier series spectra. " ...
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Textbook+Ch-2+Exercise+Scan - 54 SIGNALS AND SIGNAL SPACE...

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