MUS 215 B [[Test 1]]

MUS 215 B [[Test 1]] - MUS 215 B: Test 1 Chapter 1 Melody -...

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MUS 215 B: Test 1 Chapter 1 Melody - Succession of single tones or pitches perceived by the mind as a unity Contour - a rising and falling variation pattern Range - Distance between the lowest and highest tones of a melody, an instrument, or a voice. This span can be generally described as narrow, medium, or wide in range Interval - Distance and relationship between two pitches Conjunct -Smooth, connected melody that moves principally by small intervals Disjunct - Disjointed or disconnected melody with many leaps Phrase - Musical unit; often a component of a melody Cadence - Resting place in a musical phrase; music punctuation Countermelody - An accompanying melody sounded against the principal melody Chapter 2 Rhythm - The controlled movement of music in time Meter - Organization of rhythm in time; the grouping of beats into larger, regular patterns, notated as measures. In simple meters, such as duple, triple, and quadruple, each beat subdivides into two; in compound meters, such as sextuple, each beat divides into three Measure - A rhythmic grouping or metrical unit that contains a fixed number of beats; in notated music, it appears as a vertical line through the staff Beats - Regular pulsation; a basic unit of length in musical time Downbeat - First beat of the measure, the strongest in any meter Simple meters - Grouping of rhythms in which the beat is subdivided into two, as in duple, triple, and quadruple Compound meters - Meter in which each beat is subdivided into three rather than two Upbeats - Last beat of a measure, a weak beat, which anticipates the downbeat (the first beat of the next measure) Syncopation - Deliberate upsetting of the meter or pulse through a temporary shifting of the accent to a weak beat or an offbeat Polyrhythm - The simultaneous use of several rhythmic patterns or meters, common in twentieth-century music and in certain African music Additive meters - Groupings of irregular numbers of beats that add up to a larger, overall pattern (2 + 3 + 2 + 3 = 10) Non metric music - Music lacking a strong sense of beat or meter, common in certain non-Western cultures Chapter 3 Harmony - The simultaneous combination of notes and the ensuing relationships of intervals and chords. Not all musics of the world rely on harmony for interest, but it is central to most Western music Chord - Simultaneous combination of three or more tones that constitute a single block of harmony Scale - A series of tones or pitches in ascending or descending order. Scale tones are often assigned numbers (1– 8) or syllables (do-re-mi-fa-sol-la-ti-do) Triad - A common chord type consisting of three pitches built on alternate scale tones of a major or minor scale (e.g., 1 - 3 - 5 or 2 - 4 - 6) Major scale - A collection of seven different pitches ordered in a specific pattern of whole and half steps like so: Whole Whole Half Whole Whole Whole Half Minor scale - A collection of seven different pitches ordered in a specific pattern of whole and half steps like so: Whole Half Whole Whole Whole Half Whole
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MUS 215 B [[Test 1]] - MUS 215 B: Test 1 Chapter 1 Melody -...

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