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Secular music and the middle ages

Secular music and the middle ages - Soft(bas or loud(haut...

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Secular music and the middle ages Medieval minstrels Secular music in courts Aristocratic artists France: troubadours (south) and trouvieres (north) Germany: Minnesingers Women: troubairitz Idealized love and chivalry Secular songs sung monophonically with improvised accompaniment Anonymous: summer is icumen in One of the earliest examples of polyphony form England Set as round Composed around 1250 Text in Middle English Lower voices sing ostinato The French Ars nova Ars nova Ars antiqua Early instrumental music Central role in art music reserved for vocal music Instrumental music mostly improvised
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Unformatted text preview: Soft (bas) or loud (haut) instruments Categorized by their use (indoor or outdoor) Early string instruments included: Lute Mandolin Vielle Other soft instruments included: Dulcimer Psaltery Loud instruments: Shawn Sackbut Percussion instruments: Tabor Nakers Medieval organs: Large instruments Small instruments Renaissance Sacred Music Golden age of the a cappella style Polyphony based on principle of imitation Harmonies based on “sweeter” sounds of thirds and sixths Use of fixed melody (cantus firmus) and triple meter...
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