2-CSC446-546-SimulationExamples

2-CSC446-546-SimulationExamples - Fall2011...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fall 2011 CSC 446/546 Part 2: Simulation Examples
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fall 2011 CSC 446/546 Agenda 1. General guideline of simulations 2. Discrete event simulation 3. Steps to follow 4. Simulation of Queueing systems 4.1 Single Channel Queue 4.2 Queueing with Multiple Channels 1. Simulation of a bombing mission
Background image of page 2
Fall 2011 CSC 446/546 1. General guideline of simulations  (1)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fall 2011 CSC 446/546 1. General guideline of simulations  (2)
Background image of page 4
Fall 2011 CSC 446/546 1. General guideline of simulations  (3) Problem formulation: Every study should begin with a statement of the problem. Setting of objectives and overall project plan: The objectives indicate the questions to be answered by simulation. A determination should be made concerning whether simulation is the appropriate methodology for the problem as formulated and objectives as stated. Model conceptualization: The construction of a model of a system is probably as much art as science. The art of modeling is enhanced by an ability to abstract the essential features of a problem, to select and modify basic assumptions that characterize the system, and then to enrich and elaborate the model until a useful approximation results Data collection: There is a constant interplay between the construction of the model and the collection of the needed input data
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fall 2011 CSC 446/546 1. General guideline of simulations  (4) Model translation : Most real-world systems result in models that require a great deal of information storage and computation, so the model must be entered into a computer-recognizable format. General purpose or special purpose simulation languages or packages to be used is determined here. Verified?: Verification pertains to the computer program prepared for the simulation model. Is the computer program performing properly? Validated?: Validation usually is achieved through the calibration of the model, an iterative process of comparing the model against actual system behavior and using the discrepancies between the two, and the insights gained, to improve the model. Experimental design: The alternatives that are to be simulated must be determined. Often, the decision concerning which alternatives to simulate will be a function of runs that have been completed and analyzed. For each system design that is simulated, decisions need to be made concerning the length of the initialization period, the length of simulation runs, and the number of replications to be made of each run.
Background image of page 6
Fall 2011 CSC 446/546 1. General guideline of simulations  (5) Production runs and analysis : Production runs, and their subsequent analysis, are used to estimate measures of performance for the system designs that are being simulated. More Runs?:
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/12/2012 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Rivera during the Spring '11 term at Purdue University Calumet.

Page1 / 43

2-CSC446-546-SimulationExamples - Fall2011...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online