lecture 2

lecture 2 - The Demands of Patronage The Early Renaissance...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Demands of Patronage 20:46 The Early Renaissance in Italy “rebirth”  Donato Bramante Tempieto (Church of San Pietro in Montorio) c. 1502 Rome Classicism: the self-conscious emulation of the literature, art, and architecture of the  ancient Greek and Roman world as an inspiration for a new culture Looking back into the past to reinvigorate the present Leonardo da Vinci Vituvian Man 1492 Pen and brown ink Naturalism: the use of the direct observation of the physical world in art Italians broke from the oppressive grip of the church and began to think about the here  and the now, not just what would happen in the afterlife and how to live life on earth to  get into heaven Concerned with the things of everyday life, not of God Patronage: a system whereby you do something for me, and in return, I do something  for you Wealthy and powerful patrons who attract those who rely on their patronage for their  everyday life, favors, economic help, etc. Mafia! Informal agreements of powerful individuals with less-powerful individuals who  rely on them for things like protection
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Italian society: patronage! Ex) Medici Artists were being told what to do by patrons, the style and subject Despite what we expect, art is not fundamentally expressive in the Renaissance of  some artistic identity, but instead meeting particular demands/needs, doing specific  things Ex) altar paintings Purpose: not to be pretty pictures, instead it is to be a part of the experience of worship  and also to be an expression of the glory of God, and also of the wealth and power of  the people who are paying for and donating this stuff to the church Unknown Florentine Painter Cassone with a narrative scene C. 1460 Tempera on wood Art as part of furniture Easy to forget We’ve turned them into art as we believe art should be Artists are fundamentally skilled craftspeople How we move from a place from where artists are skilled craftspeople to a place where  artists have the kind of autonomy/freedom we think of, are considered geniuses (in the  1600s) Cimabue Enthroned Madonna and Child Tempera on Panel, 1289 Materials: Extraordinarily expensive Beginning of Renaissance: work that was valued as much for the materials used as the  skill of the artist
Background image of page 2
More money was spent on gold/precious stones than was paid to either Cimabue or the  carpenter who made the panel Materials more valuable than the labor/skill Around this time, we start to see a shift away from this idea (material > skill) Skill starts to become extremely valuable, till finally, by the end of the Renaissance  where we look at materially worthless things that get sold for a huge amount of 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/14/2012 for the course AHIS 121g taught by Professor Baker during the Spring '06 term at USC.

Page1 / 19

lecture 2 - The Demands of Patronage The Early Renaissance...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online