Spring research paper 2011

Spring research paper 2011 - Tim May ENGL 1551 Research...

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Tim May ENGL 1551 Research paper 4/26/11
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The Positive Effects of Music on Infants Music is universal and all cultures have some form of music. It is a very important element in society that can conduct and/or facilitate many actions. It can easily make someone happy or bring another to tears. It can bring people together or it can set a tone that will last the rest of someone's life. Adults take music for granted and, as time goes on, fail to see some of the other extraordinary feats that can be accomplished with music. One aspect of music that is greatly overlooked is its effects on babies, and many do not realize how beneficial it can be. Research shows music to be beneficial in many ways, and is shown to impact infants the most. Young children and even infants are known to have surprisingly complex abilities to perceive and respond to basic components of music. This musical competency, evident long before the development of speech or the ability to play a musical instrument, raises the question of the earliest age at which the nervous system and brain can adequately process, learn and remember music. Music can easily help a baby's development, even before birth, and can improve the overall health of a young one, both in the hospital and at home. Music readies the brain for specific types of thinking that are used in everyday life (Bales, 1998). Spatial-temporal, the type of thinking that involves the ability to visualize spatial patterns and ability to manipulate visual patterns over a sequence of spatial transformations, is one of the first types of thinking that music primes the brain for. Lingual thinking is the ability to produce speech and the ability to understand speech into the child mind. Music effects lingual thinking greatly because of the melodic structure of music resembles, and often mimics, speech patterns. In order for the brain to develop properly, it must be introduced to the right stimuli. Classical music is a type of music that acts as a perfect stimulus for brain development. Classical music's gentle and soft nature provides a soothing environment in which a baby can develop. Classical music is also perceived in the part of the brain that deals with spatial reasoning and math, meaning that the neuronal paths in the brain for spatial reasoning, mathematics, and classical music are similar. The structure of classical music is made to have rising and falling actions, which can be heard as the music gets louder
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and more complex or softer and simpler. This rising and falling provokes emotion, especially in babies, and the complexities of the music stir the emotional pathways of the brain into a calm developmental state. Though classical music is a wonderful conduit for brain development, the only music that really matters is the music that the baby can enjoy. A baby's exposure to music should be gentle and should consist of both consistency and some variation. A baby should have enjoyable music, a calm and gentle environment, be exposed to the music consistently, and the music should be varied from time to time. As long as the music is perceived in a positive way, the music will have positive effects. Positive
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Spring research paper 2011 - Tim May ENGL 1551 Research...

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