ATOC 184 Lecture9_Feb06_2012update

ATOC 184 Lecture9_Feb06_2012update - Chapter 3:Weather maps...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 3:Weather maps of a constant pressure surface that is horizontal versus one that is sloped Heights (a) Pressure (b) Summary of previous figures Low heights on a constant pressure surface correspond to low pressures on a constant height surface High heights on a constant pressure surface correspond to high pressures on a constant height surface Feb 6, 2012 http://severewx.atmos.uiuc.edu/current_weather.html : More recent surface and upper-air maps http://severewx.atmos.uiuc.edu/current_weather.htm : Atmospheric cross sections (radar reflectivity and winds in the vicinity of Hurricane Alicia in 1983) Weather forecasting and computer models Computer model simulation of a supercell thunderstorm The forecasting process An example of a grid that is used in numerical weather prediction models. Calculations are performed at each grid point. Computers do our complicated calculations needed to make weather forecasts! Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) Computer speeds (in thousands of operations per second) used in weather forecasting Recent NWP coverage of the North American continent. Each grid point is spaced about 12 km apart in the enclosed region Two representations of terrain in eastern North America Lawrence River Valley:...
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ATOC 184 Lecture9_Feb06_2012update - Chapter 3:Weather maps...

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