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ATOC 184 Lecture13_Feb27_2012

ATOC 184 Lecture13_Feb27_2012 - How do we get storms How do...

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How do we get storms?
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How do we get storms?
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First let us review geostrophic wind Remember that the main driver of the wind is the pressure gradient force. Wind blows from regions of high pressure to regions of low pressure
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First let us review geostrophic wind In this figure, the wind starts blowing to the north. However, as soon as the wind starts to blow, the parcel is deflected by the Coriolis force to the right.
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First let us review geostrophic wind Remember that the Coriolis force always acts to the right of the wind. Consequently, the wind continues to deflect to the right as it accelerates. The PGF changes the speed, while the Coriolis changes the direction.
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First let us review geostrophic wind Eventually, the wind achieves a balance, where the Coriolis force is balancing the PGF, resulting in a steady state wind.
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First let us review geostrophic wind This balance is geostrophic balance . For geostrophic balance, if you stand with the wind at your back, low pressure will always be to your left in the Northern Hemisphere.
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First let us review geostrophic wind As a result of geostrophic balance, winds tend to blow around low pressure systems in a counter clockwise manner in the Northern Hemisphere.
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First let us review geostrophic wind As a result of geostrophic balance, winds tend to blow around high pressure systems in a clockwise manner in the Northern Hemisphere.
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