ATOC 184 Lecture16_Mar07_2012update

ATOC 184 Lecture16_Mar07_2012update - Sea-level pressures...

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Sea-level pressures (solid contours) and fronts with a cyclone (L) moving across the central part of the continent .
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Types of fronts Fronts are classified as to which type of air mass (cold or warm) is replacing the other. For example, a cold front denotes the leading edge of a cold air mass replacing a warmer air mass. A warm front is the leading edge of a warmer air mass replacing a colder air mass.
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southeast (southeastward). The cold front has a similar vertical structure to that seen in panel A of the previous figure.
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Warm Fronts
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Cross section through two warm fronts, each with distinct characteristics:
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Warm Fronts Weather Phenomenon Prior to the Passing of the Front Contact with the Front After the Passing of the Front Temperature Cool Warming suddenly Warmer then leveling off Atmospheric Pressure Decreasing steadily Leveling off Slight rise followed by a decrease Winds South to southeast Variable South to southwest Precipitation Showers, snow, sleet or drizzle Light drizzle None Clouds Cirrus, cirrostratus, altostratus, nimbostratus, and Stratus, sometimes cumulonimbus Clearing with scattered stratus, sometimes scattered
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Meteogram for a warm front
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Two distinct examples of stationary fronts and the associated clouds
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Two examples of cross sections through stationary fronts (each part corresponds to either A or B panels in the previous figure)
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Occluded Front Occluded fronts are produced when a fast moving cold front catches and overtakes a slower moving warm front .
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The development of an occluded front
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http://www.spc.noaa.gov/exper The tornado outbreaks of March 2, 2012:
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The storm reports for March 2:
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1200 UTC, 2 March 2012:
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1500 UTC, 2 March 2012:
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1800 UTC, 2 March, 2012
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2100 UTC, 2 March
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0000 UTC, 2 March 2012:
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Question Why do cold fronts generally move more quickly than warm fronts?
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Atmospheric Stability (Chapter 6)
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Stable, neutral, and unstable positions of a ball on a smooth surface
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Stability in the atmosphere So in general the idea of stability essentially revolves around the ability of an object to return to it’s original
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This note was uploaded on 03/12/2012 for the course ATOC 184 taught by Professor Gyakum during the Winter '12 term at McGill.

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ATOC 184 Lecture16_Mar07_2012update - Sea-level pressures...

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