Report Formats for MatE 153 Lab

Report Formats for MatE 153 Lab - Materials Engineering 153...

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Materials Engineering 153 LabNotes Rev S07 Report Formats for MatE 153 Laboratory Writing Assignments for the Course At this point in your academic career, you have probably written lab reports for your instructors in physics, chemistry, or engineering classes. In this class, you will have an opportunity to write in an engineering context. Throughout the semester, you will complete four different writing assignments. These assignments all have the same general format, that of an engineering report written in response to a real-world engineering problem. The assignments are designed to start out short and straightforward. Then, as you gain more experience and the laboratory experiments become more sophisticated, the assignments become longer and more complex. What is an Engineering Report? The sections required in an engineering report are generally the same as those in a laboratory report: Introduction, Experimental Procedure, Results, Discussion, and Conclusions. An Executive Summary or a cover letter may also be required. The process for writing an engineering report is similar to writing a laboratory report, in that you must extract relevant information from the experiment and communicate that information in writing. The main differences are in: Your audience Instead of writing to your instructor, you are writing to a colleague, manager, or client. The purpose for writing Instead of demonstrating your understanding of the laboratory experiment, you are writing to describe the work you have done, the results, and their relevance to a particular question or problem. What content is appropriate For a laboratory report, you may get cues about what information is important to include from your lab manual, instructor, or old lab reports. For an engineering report, you are the expert, and are responsible for deciding, based on your experience, your audience and your purpose for writing, what information is relevant, and how much detail should be included. The assignments will identify your target audience, your purpose for writing, and give some guidelines as to what content is appropriate.
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