7 - 17.32 First, determine n for the reaction and then...

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17.29 First, determine ∆n for the reaction and then calculate Kc a) ∆n = Number of product gas moles - Number of reactant gas moles = 1 - 2 = -1 This assumes that 1000 has at least 2 significant figures. b) ∆n = Number of product gas moles - Number of reactant gas moles = 1 - 1 = 0 17.30 First, determine ∆n for the reaction and then calculate Kc using Kp = Kc a) ∆n = Number of product gas moles - Number of reactant gas moles = 2 - 2 = 0 b) ∆n = Number of product gas moles - Number of reactant gas moles = 2 - 3 = -1 17.31 First, determine ∆n for the reaction and then calculate Kp using Kp = Kc (RT) ∆n . a) ∆n = Number of product gas moles - Number of reactant gas moles = 2 - 1 = 1 b) ∆n = Number of product gas moles - Number of reactant gas moles = 2 - 4 = -2
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Unformatted text preview: 17.32 First, determine n for the reaction and then calculate Kp using Kp = Kc a) n = Number of product gas moles - Number of reactant gas moles = 2 - 2 = 0 b) n = Number of product gas moles - Number of reactant gas moles = 2 - 3 = -1 17.33 When Q < K, the reaction proceeds to the right to form more products. The reaction quotient and equilibrium constant are determined by [products] / [reactants]. For Q to increase and reach the value of K, the concentration of products (numerator) must increase in relation to the concentration of reactants (denominator). 17.34 Reactant and product concentrations are constant over time. The forward reaction rate equals the reverse reaction rate. The reaction quotient equals the equilibrium constant: Q = K....
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This note was uploaded on 03/14/2012 for the course CHEN 654 taught by Professor Nimos during the Winter '12 term at Beaufort County Community College.

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