January 19

January 19 - Olympics regardless of which season they take...

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I am not in agreement with todays topic of discussion; I think sporting nationalism unites rather than divides the national populace. Every country has its own culture and within the cultures we see traditions; like in America we say the national anthem with our right hands over our heart while we face the flag. In Spain, along with the majority of Europe we see something called a Siesta where there is a 1-3 hour break in the middle of a work day, this is a way to bond. In England this break is typically seen to go to a pub, have a drink and bond with other employers on a work break (At least this is what I noted when abroad). Regardless, every country has cultural traditions to bond the citizens and unite everyone together. These traditions reflect, magnify, and create understandings of the nation and national identity (slides). Sporting nationalism is also seen united during the
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Unformatted text preview: Olympics regardless of which season they take place in; summer or winter. Countries especially bond the most during post-traumatic events. When the USA faced the life-changing problems of 9/11, we saw tributes relating to this world-effecting event taking place at many ceremonies. At football games, the all-American sport, we saw celebrities singing, fire marshals speaking, and other ceremony/tribute like events happening. These tributes seemed to be more of a bonding experience for the citizens and nation than a dividing factor I believe that all sporting nationalism frequently unite all kinds of people and brings a common enjoyment and shared tradition within a country; and this essential is what brings Spirit and pride in a country....
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