Locke, Essay, Book II, Ch. xxii; Identity nd Diversity

Locke, Essay, Book II, Ch. xxii; Identity nd Diversity - An...

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Unformatted text preview: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding Book II: Ideas John Locke Copyright © 2010–2015 All rights reserved. Jonathan Bennett [Brackets] enclose editorial explanations. Small ·dots· enclose material that has been added, but can be read as though it were part of the original text. Occasional •bullets, and also indenting of passages that are not quotations, are meant as aids to grasping the structure of a sentence or a thought. Every four-point ellipsis . . . . indicates the omission of a brief passage that seems to present more difficulty than it is worth. Longer omissions are reported on, between [brackets], in normal-sized type. First launched: July 2004 Last amended: August 2007 Contents Chapter i: Ideas in general, and their origin 18 Chapter ii: Simple ideas 23 Chapter iii: Ideas of one sense 24 Chapter iv: Solidity 24 Chapter v: Simple ideas of different senses 27 Chapter vi: Simple ideas of reflection 27 Chapter vii: Simple ideas of both sensation and reflection 27 Essay II John Locke Chapter viii: Some further points about our simple ideas 29 Chapter ix: Perception 34 Chapter x: Retention 37 Chapter xi: Discerning, and other operations of the mind 39 Chapter xii: Complex ideas 43 Chapter xiii: Simple modes, starting with the simple modes of space 46 Chapter xiv: Duration and its simple modes 52 Chapter xv: Duration and expansion, considered together 57 Chapter xvi: Number 60 Chapter xvii: Infinity 62 Chapter xviii: Other simple modes 67 Chapter xix: The modes of thinking 68 Chapter xx: Modes of pleasure and pain 69 Chapter xxi: Power 72 Chapter xxii: Mixed modes 93 Chapter xxiii: Complex ideas of substances 97 Chapter xxiv: Collective ideas of substances 107 Chapter xxv: Relation 109 Chapter xxvi: Cause and effect, and other relations 111 Essay II John Locke Chapter xxvii: Identity and diversity 112 Chapter xxviii: Other relations 122 Chapter xxix: Clear and obscure, distinct and confused ideas 127 Chapter xxx: Real and fantastical ideas 131 Chapter xxxi: Adequate and inadequate ideas 133 Chapter xxxii: True and false ideas 137 Chapter xxxiii: The association of ideas 141 Essay II John Locke xxv: Relation Chapter xxv: Relation 1. Besides the ideas, simple and complex, that the mind has of things considered on their own, it gets other ideas from comparison between different things. [For Locke, a ‘comparison’ can be any kind of considering together of two things, not necessarily likening them to one another.] When the understanding thinks about a thing, it isn’t confined to that precise object: it can look beyond it, to see how it relates to some other thing. When the mind sets one thing alongside another (so to speak) and carries its view from one to the other, this is what we call relation and respect . A word is called relative if applying it to one thing signifies such a respect and leads the thought from the original subject to something else. The things that are thus brought together are said to be related ....
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Locke, Essay, Book II, Ch. xxii; Identity nd Diversity - An...

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