{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Experiment 3 - Experiment 3 Flow Through a Sluice Gate and...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Experiment 3 Flow Through a Sluice Gate and Hydraulic Jump Report Written by : Duncan Curtis Email : [email protected] Date Experiment Completed : March 7, 2012 Date Submitted: March 14, 2012 Group B18 Group Members Duncan Curtis Jonathan Penner Brad Moore
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Summary The purpose of this lab was to see the relationship between different fluid principles. During the experiment measurements of depth and total head were taken in three different areas along a water channel. These measurements were taken at the hydraulic jump, before and after the sluice gate. These measurements were taken for two different flow rates. Velocity was calculated after the sluice gate and from that velocity, flow rate of the water channel. This was compared with the measured value for the flow rate. The flow rate calculated was lower than the flow rate from the experimental values, this occurred for both trials. The measured total head before and after the sluice gate showed an increase in head after it went through the gate. This was the opposite for trial two where the head decreased. Both the calculated and measured height of the water after the hydraulic jump for both flow rates were fairly similar but not exact. Nomenclature P = pressure (Pascal- P qtm = 101325 Pa) z = height (meter) Q= flow rate (meter 3 /second) g = acceleration due to gravity (metre/second 2 -9.81 m/s 2 ) ρ = density (water = 1000 kg/m 3 , air = 1.2 kg/m 3 ) V = velocity (meter/second) A = cross sectional area (meter 2 ) m = mass flow rate (kilogram/second) w = width (meter) F = Force (Newton) H = Total Head (meter) = Change in Flow Analysis Volume Flow Rate The volume flow rate for the experiment can be calculated in two ways. The first way is through using the calibrated V-notch in the collection tank. The equation to calculate the flow rate was: Eq (1) Q=1.38H 2.5 (Where H is the height of the V-notch) The second method is using the velocity and the area at a specific portion of the water channel. The equation to calculate flow rate this way was: Eq (2) Q=VA
Image of page 2
Before the flow rate can be calculated with equation 2, the velocity has to be calculated.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern