Chapter4-1 - Lesson 4 Mitigation Mitigation Topics:...

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Mitigation Lesson 4 Mitigation
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Topics: Introduction What is mitigation? What are the types of mitigation? What are the Obstacles to Mitigation? How to select Mitigation Options? How to incorporating mitigation into insurance and development projects? Conclusion
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Introduction Mitigation is often considered the ‘cornerstone of disaster management’ (FEMA, 2005) “Activities taken to reduce the severity or consequences of an emergency” (NFPA 1600) Mitigation measures seek to actually reduce the likelihood or consequences of hazard risk before a disaster ever occurs Mitigation has only recently been recognized for its full potential at controlling hazard risk Mitigation can be costly, disruptive, time consuming, and in some cases socially unpalatable
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What is Mitigation? Any sustained effort undertaken to reduce a hazard risk, performed through the reduction of either or both the likelihood and consequence components of that given hazard’s risk Mitigation seeks to either make a hazard less likely to occur, or to reduce the negative effects that would result if it were to occur There is a unique set of associated mitigation options for each hazard, each with its own cost, feasibility, and expected success rate
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Mitigation Goals Risk Likelihood Reduction Risk Consequence Reduction Risk Avoidance Risk Acceptance Risk Transfer, Sharing, or Spreading
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Risk Likelihood Reduction For many hazards, it is possible to reduce the chance that the hazard will manifest itself Technological and intentional hazards tend to have a greater overall application of measures that seek to reduce hazard likelihood, simply because the existence of these hazards is a direct result of some human decision that allowed for them to exist in the first place While we can’t feasibly ‘decide’ not to have a natural hazard, we clearly can do so with other hazard forms. Mitigation measures that seek to reduce risk likelihood tend to be non-structural in nature
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Risk Consequence Reduction Assume that a hazard will occur, with an associated intensity or magnitude Ensure that the protected structure, population, system, or other subject is able to withstand such an event Most hazards present disaster managers with at least one or more reduction options: Natural disasters – measures tend to be structural, and address the hardening of structures and systems, and the protection of people Technological hazards – involve the development of primary and redundant safety, containment, and cleanup systems Intentional hazards - still in the primary stages of development, though the pace has increased
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Risk Avoidance Some risks so great that no reduction is enough Only total avoidance is considered Either likelihood or consequence factor must be reduced to absolute zero Future discoveries may one day allow for better manageability of the hazard Natural hazards - avoidance may involve removing
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Chapter4-1 - Lesson 4 Mitigation Mitigation Topics:...

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