week2-p2 - Week 2-Part 2 History and Disaster Trends in...

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Unformatted text preview: Week 2-Part 2 History and Disaster Trends in Canada Ali Asgary, York University, Winter 2011 Content A brief history of emergency management in Canada Disaster trends in Canada A Brief History of Canadian Emergency Management Source Plan for tomorrow ...TODAY! The Story of Emergency Preparedness Canada 1948-1998 Creation of the Air Raid Precautions Organization (ARP) in 1937 A Fe deral government organization under the Department of Pensions and National Health . ( Civil Defence in the Second World War: The Air Raid Precautions Organiza ) The Origin to order evacuations , to put precautionary measures in place against attack , to close or destroy damaged or contaminated buildings, to limit lights and sounds , to institute curfews . ARP Activities Expansion of ARP By 1941 ARP groups existed in about 150 communities and almost 95,000 volunteers. The federal government had spent approximately $400,000 supporting local warning sirens , black-out precautions and other measures . Increasing Threat and Reaction With the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1942 the role of the ARP increased . Born of Civil defense In 1943 the ARP program was renamed Civil Defense and became a more integral part of Canadas defense systems. In total some 775 communities were organized and about 280,000 workers were enrolled in ARP / CD activities. In 1948 , building on the experience of ARP, the federal government decided to re-establish a civil defence organization. Once again federal officials assumed a planning and coordinating role, providing training , research , and limited financing . Re-establishing Civil Defense Federal, Provincial and Local Responsibility Civil defence was decentralized , with the federal and provincial governments responsible for planning, training, and coordinating and the local governments responsible for implementing the program. This continues to underlie the division of responsibility. CD organization placed in Dept of National Health and Welfare In 1951 CD was transferred to the Department of National Health and Welfare because of the nature of the services it would supply to the civil population in the event of war. Early Cold War Period (1950-60) The only mission was to deal with the threat of nuclear weapons. Evacuation and shelter were the main responses. Health and medical equipment was stockpiled across the country. Communication and attack warning systems were installed. Cold War Culture: The Nuclear Fear of the 1950s and 1960s Creation of EMO In June 1957, an agency known as the E mergency M easures O rganization was set up....
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week2-p2 - Week 2-Part 2 History and Disaster Trends in...

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