MVS 320 Lab 1 - Megan Gueli MVS 320 Section 005 Laboratory...

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Megan Gueli MVS 320 Section 005 Laboratory 1: Phasic and Tonic Muscle Activation Patterns
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Module 1: Introduction: The purpose of this experiment is to examine the relationship between the magnitude of phasic muscle activity and the speed of the movement when in a rhythmic pattern. By comparing elbow displacement and muscle activity in the biceps and triceps at certain angles, then how the speed affects the magnitude of phasic muscle activity should be visible. It is expected that as the speed increases the magnitude will increase as a result. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the biceps and triceps will work in a reciprocal activation/inhibition manner. Methods: After cleaning the application area on the biceps and triceps with an alcohol pad, you then attach two of the blue electrode pads to the skin in a straight line along the length of each muscle. Then to reduce the amount of stray electricity from the electromyography signal, EMG, which records muscle activity in the biceps and triceps, it is recommended that you attach a ground electrode to a bony surface area. Then place channel 1 so that it corresponds to the biceps muscle, and channel 2 to correspond with the triceps and secure the wires using tape or pre-wrap. The third, black channel should attach to your ground site at the epicondyle of the wrist. Next extend the arm so the wrist is in a neutral position and the thumb is facing upwards. The electrogoniometer, which records elbow joint displacement, should be placed across the elbow joint just above the elbow crease. Attach the ends of the electrogoniometer to lay along the long axis of the 2
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upper arm and the forearm. Keeping movement amplitude constant the subject will begin a cyclic motion that will then be recorded using Vernier software. Results: As shown in figure 1, as the velocity increases duration of the muscle burst decreases. Specifically, when the average peak velocity increased from 116.6 degrees per second to 198 degrees per second, the muscle burst duration decreased from 1.2 seconds to 0.6 seconds. Ultimately, showing a decreased duration of 50% when going from a slow velocity to a medium velocity. This relationship can also be shown when going from a medium velocity and a fast velocity. When going from a velocity of 198 degrees per second to a 288 degrees and second, the duration also decreased from 0.6 seconds to 0.3 seconds again halving itself. This relationship can also be found in table 1 in numerical form. However, no clear relationship was found between the average peak velocity and the muscle burst magnitude. Between average peak velocities of 116.6 degrees per second and 198 degrees per second, the muscle burst magnitude increased from 0.28 au to 0.84 au. This relationship shows that as velocity increases muscle burst magnitude also rises. However, when going from a medium velocity to fast velocity, the muscle burst magnitude decreases. When going from a velocity of 198 degrees per second to 288 degrees per second, the muscle burst duration decreases from 0.84 au to 0.31 au. Since going from a slow velocity to a medium velocity, and a medium velocity to a fast velocity 3
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show conflicting results no conclusion can be made. This can be seen in numerical form
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MVS 320 Lab 1 - Megan Gueli MVS 320 Section 005 Laboratory...

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