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Ghettos - was given the right to seize an individual’s...

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o Ghettos started because there were housing shortages from the Great Depression, federal law permitted racial segregation, and the Federal Housing Administration denied loans to many nonwhites. o Covenants- white home settlers could include in their deeds to their property covenants, which upheld the “desirable residential characteristics” of a neighborhood, restricting the purchase of land or property to certain religious and racial groups. Rendered legally unbinding in 1948 o Redlining- refusing to offer mortgages and home loads in nonwhite neighborhoods through this discriminating process. Name comes from lenders circling a red ink border around nonwhite residential communities. o To save money, slumlords ignored repairs and occupancy codes o After WWII, cities infrastructure such as highways, hospitals, and sewage were made to go trough nonwhite communities o Urban Renewal- first time in the country’s history that the government
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Unformatted text preview: was given the right to seize an individual’s property not for its own use but for reassignment to another individual for his use and profit. o As the Civil Rights Movement gained way, nonwhites with some resources and savings accounts moved out of slum areas into those traditionally saved for whites. White Flight- by fearing racial integration, many whites sold their houses in the city and fled to the suburbs, in the 1950’s • Spurred on by deindustrialization • Fear exploited by “blockbusting agents”, who scared whites, bought their houses for cheap, and then sold it to colored people for a higher price. • Federal government supported this with the New Deal, Federal Housing Administration, and the Veterans Administration. • As whites fled, they took their wealth with them depleting the cities’ tax base...
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