BIS2C+lect+8+Rizzo+prokaryote+biology

BIS2C+lect+8+Rizzo+prokaryote+biology - Lecture 7:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Lecture 7: Prokaryote reproduction Lecture 8: Prokaryote Biology Lecture 9: Prokaryote Diversity Source of antibiotic resistance genes for human pathogens? 1. Antibiotic-producing bacteria 2. Other human/animal pathogens that are already antibiotic resistance 3. Other human-associated bacteria (non-pathogens) that are already antibiotic resistance 4. Free-living bacteria (e.g., soil, air) that are already antibiotic resistance Aminov RI, Mackie RI. 2007. Evolution and ecology of antibiotic resistance genes. FEMS Microbiology Letters 271: 147-161. 2 2 S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 1 | VO L 4 7 7 | N AT U R E | 4 5 7 Bacteria (/baek t ri/ ; singular : bacterium ) are a large group of single-celled, prokaryote microorganisms. Typically a few micrometres in length, bacteria have a wide range of shapes, ranging from spheres to rods and spirals. Bacteria are ubiquitous in every habitat on Earth, growing in soil, acidic hot springs, radioactive waste, water, and deep in the Earth's crust, as well as in organic matter and the live bodies of plants and animals. There are typically 40 million bacterial cells in a gram of soil and a million bacterial cells in a millilitre of fresh water; in all, there are approximately five nonillion (5 10 30 ) bacteria on Earth, forming much of the world's biomass. Bacteria are vital in recycling nutrients, with many steps in nutrient cycles depending on these organisms, such as the fixation of nitrogen from the atmosphere and putrefaction. However, most bacteria have not been characterised, and only about half of the phyla of bacteria have species that can be grown in the laboratory. The study of bacteria is known as bacteriology, a branch of microbiology....
View Full Document

This document was uploaded on 03/18/2012.

Page1 / 58

BIS2C+lect+8+Rizzo+prokaryote+biology - Lecture 7:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online