1 (2) - Germany has historically considered itself a...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Germany has historically considered itself a monolingual state, with concerns about dialect differences representing the primary German interest with linguistic diversity. Likewise, Germany has never considered itself to be an ³immigrant nation², but rather an ³immigrant friendly nation² (Clyne 1995, Fennel 1997), thus underscoring a sense of ethnic homogeneity that mirrors its sense of linguistic homogeneity. Nonetheless, there were over 5 million foreign nationals (constituting 7.3% of the total population) living, working, and speaking non-German languages in Germany at the time this research was conducted in 1993-4. Many of these immigrants came to Germany at the request of the German government during the post-war economic boom. In order to combat labor shortages, Germany established labor contracts with the governments of different countries that would allow foreign workers (generally, but not exclusively, male workers) to come into the country and work for 1-3 years after which they would be ³rotated² out and replaced by new workers. Of all the labor contracts Germany made, the contract with Turkey, which was signed in 1961, has had the most significant sociopolitical impact on Germany because it began a period of unprecedented migration to Germany. Although Turkish immigrants came to Germany for various reasons, migration to Germany....
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 2

1 (2) - Germany has historically considered itself a...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online