Lecture 11 - Ocean Energy Systems

Lecture 11 - Ocean Energy Systems - ECE 4364/5374G:...

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1 ECE 4364/5374G (c) Saifur Rahman 1 Professor Saifur Rahman Electrical & Computer Engineering Dept. Virginia Tech ECE 4364/5374G: Alternate Energy Systems Lecture 11: Ocean Energy Systems Guest Lecture by George Hagerman (c) George Hagerman 2 Lecture 11 Tidal Power ECpE 4364 Alternate Energy Systems George Hagerman, Senior Research Associate Center for Energy and the Global Environment Virginia Tech Alexandria Research Institute
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2 (c) George Hagerman 3 Non-Conventional Hydropower Lecture 11 – Tidal Power – Astronomical and geographic influences that determine magnitude and timing of tidal energy resource availability – Harnessing tidal changes in sea level using conventional hydropower technology – Harnessing tidal currents using turbines and other submerged devices – Homework on use and interpretation of tide prediction software Lecture 12 – Wave Power – Meteorological and geographic influences that determine magnitude and timing of wave energy resource availability – Basic wave energy conversion principals – Existing demonstration projects (c) George Hagerman 4 Goals for Lecture 11 Appreciation for the forces that produce tides Unlike wind, solar, or hydro power, the energy available in tides is little influenced by weather. Furthermore, the timing and magnitude of tidal energy resources are precisely predictable and repeatable. Where to find and how to interpret tidal predictions Tidal sea level predictions are needed to evaluate the feasibility of any tidal power project. The assignment at the end of this lecture involves hands-on use and interpretation of on-line tidal resource information. Harnessing tides with conventional hydropower technology Modern tidal power plants use the same basic process to harness tidal energy as grain mills that have operated since the Middle Ages. The tide floods freely into a bay through sluice gates in a dam. At high tide, the the gates are closed to trap the water at its highest level. After the ocean level outside has fallen far enough during ebb tide to create a usable head, the trapped flood waters are released through a turbine-generator.
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3 (c) George Hagerman 5 Goals for Lecture 11 (continued) Conversion strategies for conventional hydro tidal power • Single-effect (flood-fill, ebb-generation) or double-effect • Optimizing for maximum power or maximum-duration Milestones in conventional hydro tidal power development • La Rance River estuary, France – World ` s largest (240 MWe) and longest-operating (since 1966) tidal power plant. • Kislaya Guba, Russia – Pioneered float-in construction of dam and
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This note was uploaded on 03/16/2012 for the course ECE 5374G taught by Professor Srahman during the Spring '12 term at Virginia Tech.

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Lecture 11 - Ocean Energy Systems - ECE 4364/5374G:...

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