ResearchPaperExample

ResearchPaperExample - British Columbia Offshore Oil and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: British Columbia Offshore Oil and Gas Excavation Shirin Farrahi 20000-0000 ENSC 100 and 101 19 November 2001 1 1. Introduction For over thirty years, offshore oil and gas excavation has not been allowed in the waters of the Queen Charlotte Islands (QCI) basin off British Columbia. Although the federal moratorium preventing excavation of the area was poised to be removed in the mid-1980’s, the government was influenced to maintain it after the Exxon Valdez oil spill disaster in Alaska. Recently, the British Columbia government, interested in boosting the province’s ailing economy, has asked the federal government to reconsider lifting the moratorium. In support of the province’s request, a report was released on October 22 by the BC engineering firm, Jacques Whitford Environment Ltd. It stated that “there are no unique fatal flaws that would rule out exploration and development activities.” (Beatty and Sandler 2001, A1) This point may be true, however, it does not necessarily mean that the government should allow excavation to proceed. Offshore oil and gas excavation entails several major risks, which, although they can be minimized, will never be eliminated. Therefore, unless a serious proponent from industry comes forth with an offer to excavate the oil or gas off the BC coast in a way that curtails risks, the potential hazards involved in the venture are too great. This proponent must be willing to spend the required time and money to ensure that the project follows the necessary regulations. Even after identifying a suitable candidate for excavation, the decision about whether or not it should be allowed requires years of careful consideration as “it is going to be one of the most important decisions to be made on this coast” (Hill 2000, 124). ∗ ∗ All quotations where the authors are not listed in the References at the end of this paper come from the following source: Exploring the Future of Offshore Oil and Gas Development in BC . May 2000. Conference at Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC. <http://www.sfu.ca/ cstudies/science/oilgas/index.htm>. 2 2. The Risks Misconceptions regarding the risks of offshore oil and gas excavation are very common. Many people believe the most serious risk involved is the threat of oil spills and blowouts. Oil spills most often occur during transportation of the hydrocarbon, whereas a blowout occurs when pressure inside a well causes it to explode during the drilling phase. Although oil spills and blowouts are very serious occurrences, the environmental impact is dependent on factors such as ocean currents, the type of hydrocarbon being produced, the weather, and other physical characteristics of the site (Maritime Awards Society of Canada 2001). For example, as long as an oil spill is far enough from any coast, the impacts will be minimal. When accidents occur on a large scale, they tend to be highly publicized. People are horrified by images of dying fish and birds covered in oil, but they do not realize that although the effects of a blowout or major oil...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 13

ResearchPaperExample - British Columbia Offshore Oil and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online