ResearchPaperPitfalls

ResearchPaperPitfalls - Research Paper Issues Steve...

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Research Paper Issues Research Paper Issues Steve Whitmore October 2010
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Research Paper Issues Learning Objectives By the end of this module, you will understand how to recognize and deal with common flaws in research papers. As well, you will understand the format expectations for 100/101 research paper
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Research Paper Issues Mental Models? Dualistic – Analyzes problems as black and white. Based upon supposedly universal values. Relativistic – Analyzes problems as shades of grays. Based upon supposedly personal values. Probabilistic – Analyzes problems based upon the balance of probabilities. Based upon supposedly logical values. Commitment – Analyzes problems based upon all of the above. Based upon values derived from experience.
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Research Paper Issues Common Pitfalls Writing an informative paper Choosing a persuasive topic, but failing to establish common ground Arguing against a position that no reasonable, thinking person would hold Overstating your case Making absolute statements (If you say that something is always or never the case, the reader needs only one exception in order to refute your argument and cast doubt on your credibility). Failing to provide a solution to the problem or to make recommendations aimed at finding a solution. One-sided arguments (only presenting half the evidence or presenting it in a weak form).
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Common Pitfalls (Cont’d) Lack of citations to provide support for your opinions and to note the sources of ideas and facts that are not common knowledge. Using too many citations. Where possible, use the text of your paper to signal when you are changing sources so that you need not repeat the same citation at the end of subsequent sentences – “The following section is based upon Smith’s analysis of the issue (2004).” Failing to clarify what you want your readers to do or how you want them to change the way they think.
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ResearchPaperPitfalls - Research Paper Issues Steve...

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