Newton - Newtonian Dynamics Richard Fitzpatrick Professor...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Newtonian Dynamics Richard Fitzpatrick Professor of Physics The University of Texas at Austin Contents 1 Introduction 7 1.1 Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.2 Scope of Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 Major Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 Newton’s Laws of Motion 9 2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.2 Newtonian Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.3 Newton’s Laws of Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.4 Newton’s First Law of Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.5 Newton’s Second Law of Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.6 Newton’s Third Law of Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.7 Non-Isolated Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 3 One-Dimensional Motion 21 3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.2 Motion in a General One-Dimensional Potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.3 Velocity Dependent Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.4 Simple Harmonic Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 3.5 Damped Oscillatory Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 3.6 Quality Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 3.7 Resonance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 3.8 Periodic Driving Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3.9 Transients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 3.10 Simple Pendulum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 3.11 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 4 Multi-Dimensional Motion 45 4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS 4.2 Motion in a Two-Dimensional Harmonic Potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 4.3 Projectile Motion with Air Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 4.4 Charged Particle Motion in Electric and Magnetic Fields . . . . . . . . . . . 51 4.5 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 5 Planetary Motion 55 5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 5.2 Kepler’s Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 5.3 Newtonian Gravity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 5.4 Conservation Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 5.5 Polar Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 5.6 Conic Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 5.7 Kepler’s Second Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 5.8 Kepler’s First Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 5.9 Kepler’s Third Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 5.10 Orbital Energies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 5.11 Kepler Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 5.12 Motion in a General Central Force-Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 5.13 Motion in a Nearly Circular Orbit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 5.14 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 6 Two-Body Dynamics 77 6.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 6.2 Reduced Mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 6.3 Binary Star Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 6.4 Scattering in the Center of Mass Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 6.5 Scattering in the Laboratory Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 6.6 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 7 Rotating Reference Frames 93 7.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 7.2 Rotating Reference Frames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 7.3 Centrifugal Acceleration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 7.4 Coriolis Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 7.5 Foucault Pendulum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 7.6 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 8 Rigid Body Rotation 105 8.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 8.2 Fundamental Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 8.3 Moment of Inertia Tensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 8.4 Rotational Kinetic Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 8.5 Matrix Eigenvalue Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Image of page 2
CONTENTS 3 8.6 Principal Axes of Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 8.7 Euler’s Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 8.8 Eulerian Angles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 8.9 Gyroscopic Precession . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 8.10 Rotational Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 8.11 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 9 Lagrangian Dynamics 127 9.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 9.2 Generalized Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 9.3 Generalized Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 9.4 Lagrange’s Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 9.5 Motion in a Central Potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 9.6 Atwood Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 9.7 Sliding down a Sliding Plane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 9.8 Generalized Momenta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 9.9 Spherical Pendulum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 9.10 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 10 Hamiltonian Dynamics 141 10.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 10.2 Calculus of Variations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 10.3 Conditional Variation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 10.4 Multi-Function Variation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 10.5 Hamilton’s Principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 10.6 Constrained Lagrangian Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 10.7 Hamilton’s Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 10.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 11 Coupled Oscillations 155 11.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 11.2 Equilibrium State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 11.3 Stability Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 11.4 More Matrix Eigenvalue Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 11.5 Normal Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 11.6 Normal Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 11.7 Spring-Coupled Masses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 11.8 Triatomic Molecule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 11.9 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 12 Gravitational Potential Theory 169 12.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 12.2 Gravitational Potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4 NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS 12.3 Axially Symmetric Mass Distributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 12.4 Potential Due to a Uniform Sphere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 12.5 Potential Outside a Uniform Spheroid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 12.6 Rotational Flattening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 12.7 McCullough’s Formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 12.8 Tidal Elongation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 12.9 Roche Radius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 12.10 Precession and Forced Nutation of the Earth
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern