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1 Developing Literacy Lessons for Academically Diverse Learners Tunisia Ananaba Master of Science in Education, Walden University READ 6609: Literacy in Academically Diverse Classrooms Dr. Sherry Schock August 10, 2020
2 Developing Literacy Lessons for Academically Diverse Learners Teachers have an overwhelming amount of responsibilities in the classroom. When I am planning lessons for my students I always attempt to cover multiple standards with one activity. Math is a subject that is considered to focus primarily on numbers, but after experiencing the many mathematic courses here at Walden, I have grown to understand that reading and writing are just as important in mathematics as any other subject. Cross curricular teaching is beneficial because it allows the teacher to make the best of the given time. The activity that was implemented for this assignment was a kindergarten literacy and math lesson with a focus on addition and understanding key details within a text. This activity was completed as a small group activity and groups were built based on academic ability. In each of the groups the content provided was the same but differentiation was provided to meet the needs of each individual student. The math and literacy lesson that I prepared for the students went particularly well. The Math Start and the Math Matters book series are wonderful tools to integrate math concepts and literary components. One of the concepts that the kindergarten team discussed in collaborative planning was addition with objects, drawings, verbal explanations, and equations (Georgia Standards of Excellence, 2016). There were several literacy components that were also incorporated in the lesson and they were as follows: actively engaging in group reading, ask and answer questions with prompting, understanding basic features of print, understanding syllables and sounds; and using drawing, dictating, or writing to convey information (Georgia Standards of Excellence, 2016). I begin the activity with students beginning in their flexible groups reading their assigned text. The struggling reader group read Seeweed Soup by Stuart Murphy, the on grade level group read Jack the Builder also by Stuart Murphy, and the above grade level group
3 read A Collection for Kate by Barbara deRubertis. Students read the text and those students that needed support reading used their iPad’s to access the recording of the provided stories. After completing their stories I was able to assess student understanding with the use of the “reading cube”. That portion of the activity was extremely informative because I was able to determine each student’s level of comprehension. After using the “reading cube” students were instructed to complete the addition activity sheet that was differentiated based on ability.

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