Ramifications of information and disclosers of improper information could cause difficulty in find

Ramifications of information and disclosers of improper information could cause difficulty in find

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Ramifications of information and disclosers of improper information could cause difficulty in finding patient information and could inflict complications with the privacy rules or practices. “To respond to HIPAA, physicians and hospitals need to review operational processes related to location of medical records, access to medical records, access to databases that house protected health information, and disclosures.” (Baylor University medical Center proceedings/ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) HIPAA has very strict privacy rules. HIPAA is inclined not to inform any one person about his condition. The privacy rules state that covered entities must have privacy practices that are appropriate for its health care service, notify patient of their privacy right and how their information can be used or disclosed, and all trained employees have to understand the privacy practice, appoint a privacy official to see that the privacy practices are followed correctly, and safeguard patients’ records. HIPAA helps protect all the patients’ information from their name to their fingerprint. If the information about this patient got out his life could change, the way people treated him or even thought about him; who knows if he has told his family and friends. That is why HIPAA is dedicated to making sure that patient information is not given to anyone who might take advantage of the information they could/would find. Mr. Brown like all of the information we receive at HIPAA is locked down, there is no way for anyone without prior authorization to get the patients information, no matter what the circumstances are. No matter if a patient has a low status file or a high status file I can tell HIPAA will take care of each and every one of them to make sure they are protected. HIPAA is here is help our patients keep their doctor visits as private as possible. HIV and AIDS are the most serious diseases to date. Doctors discovered the first case of AIDS in the U.S. around 20 years ago, and today an estimated 42 million people live with HIV and AIDS (Teens Health, 2009). Additionally, another 300,000 people are estimated to have either HIV or AIDS but are unaware of their condition. Around 40,000 new HIV infections occur annually (The Body, 2001). As long as HIPAA exists, the privacy of every patient’s medical information—including any information about HIV and AIDS—will be protected and n.d.). AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The body’s CD4 helper lymphocytes, which are defense cells, are destroyed by HIV. These lymphocytes are contained in the immune system, which is the bodily system that helps to ward off infections. As the CD4 lymphocytes are being destroyed by HIV, the body begins to develop other infections that would
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normally not affect it. Once the immune system has been destroyed by HIV, the body develops acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). People who have AIDS are unable to fight off
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This note was uploaded on 03/17/2012 for the course HEALTHCARE 240 taught by Professor Myles during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Ramifications of information and disclosers of improper information could cause difficulty in find

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