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Paper2 - Joel Diaz Option#3 Critique of the Mexican...

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Joel Diaz 10-28-10 Option #3 Critique of the Mexican Revolution The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela is based on the life of an uneducated Indian man, by the name of Demetrio Macias, who joined the rebel army in order to save his family. He proves himself to his fellow rebels, through his actions and charisma, and becomes their leader. The book is based on Mariano Azuela’s own experiences of the Mexican Revolution. His persona in the novel is a fictional character, Luis Cervantes. Mariano Azuela seems to criticize the Mexican Revolution through his characters and their actions. His characters seem to become more and more disillusioned as the novel goes on and the revolution progresses. An example that demonstrates that Mariano Azuela intended his novel to be a critique of the Mexican Revolution is the way he illustrates that some parts of the revolution are exaggerated or glorified. When Luis Cervantes encounters the rebels, he speaks of how the revolution benefits the poor and ignorant, and how the rich man takes advantage of the poor, turning their sweat, blood, and tears into gold (Azuela, pg.26). The rebels at first did not understand him, and some wished to kill him out of distrust. This reveals that most of the rebels did not understand the cause they were fighting for which demonstrates his critical view on the war. There were also many rumors about the rebels that made it seem like the lifestyle of a rebel was more glorifying than a Federale. A Federale, who was drafted, told
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