test 2 terms list - Econ100 Test 2 Terms List Tucker (Ch....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Econ100 Test 2 Terms List 18:26 Tucker (Ch. 1-5) Economics defined Economics studies The way people make choices The possible consequences of these choices The policy responses that society might take to deal with those consequences Scarcity The condition in which human wants are forever greater than the available supply of  time, goods, and resources Production and Allocation Links Production link – producing max amount of goods and services from resources at hand Allocation link – how these goods and services should be allocated to get the max  amount of human satisfaction The 3 Basic Questions What are we going to produce? (What?) How are we going to produce it? (How?) When we produce it, who gets it? (For whom?) Ceteris Paribus Assumption “all else the same” When establishing a relationship between 2 variables, we must assume ceteris paribus  (that all other variables are constant) Opportunity Cost and Other Basic Concepts Opportunity cost – cost as measured by the highest valued foregone alternative to a  choice
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ex. Going to class as opposed to sleeping Production Possibility Curves Shows what the capability is of an economy to produce a certain good at that time (on  spectrum between two goods) Production of one good must be sacrificed to increase production of other goods Points along the curve indicate max efficiency of production within the economy Points inside the curve indicate wasted resources Points outside the curve are unattainable for that economy at the given time Specialization and Exchange Specialization and division of labor increases productivity Ex. Nascar Pit Crew More efficient for an economy to focus on production of one good (specialization) in  which they have a comparative advantage and exchange it through trade with other  economies for their goods Law of Demand There is an inverse relationship between price and amount consumed Quantity Demanded (QD)  Law of Supply There is a direct relationship between the price of a good and the quantity sellers are  willing and able to offer for sale in a defined period  Quantity Supplied (QS)  Demand Shifters 1. Income (Y)  D  ; Y   D  (Normal Goods)  D  ; Y   D   (Inferior Goods)
Background image of page 2
2. Tastes/Preferences (Popularity of goods) Popularity   D  ; Popularity   D  3. Number of buyers Number of buyers   D  ; Number of buyers   D  4. Price of related goods Goods consumed together (compliment products) Ex. Peanut Butter and Jelly P pb   Qd pb   D j  P pb   Qd pb   D j  Goods consumed in place of the other (substitute goods)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/19/2012 for the course COMM 200 taught by Professor Young during the Fall '11 term at University of Delaware.

Page1 / 17

test 2 terms list - Econ100 Test 2 Terms List Tucker (Ch....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online