exam 1 study guide - Exam 1 Study Guide 19:29 What is a...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Exam 1 Study Guide 19:29 What is a Theory? A set of related propositions that presents a systematic view of phenomena by  specifying relationships among concepts Allow for prediction and explanation 4 Roles of Theories for Humans To understand, reduce uncertainty, explain, predict Types of Naïve Theories Used By Humans Intuition You hold a theory to be true based upon your own personal values; possibly based on  your socialization as a child (gut feeling) Authority Theories based on information of people that you believe to be an expert Ex. Doctors, Lawyers, Religious Figures, People on TV Tradition Theories based upon beliefs that have always been held as true (Ex. Wives Tales) Naïve Observation Theories that are established by our own personal observations with no testing done  Errors in Naïve Observation Inadequate sample – in order to generalize some phenomena to the entire population,  you need a random, representative sample Inadequate attention – someone tends to see and observe what they want to see Overgeneralization – assuming the results of a small sample would be the same for  everyone Bias in Observation – your own beliefs come into play to skew the results
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ex. Religious beliefs, cultural beliefs Illogical reasoning – coming to conclusions that don’t make sense Premature closure – people see a connection in a specific instance and assume that the  connection will always be there without sufficient study Developing a theory after an observation without testing it enough Characteristics of Science Systematic – science works from an accepted, ordered system of proven methods; not  random or haphazard Rational – uses reasonable methods to reach reasonable conclusions Deals with questions of fact, not necessarily questions of values Self-correcting – theories are continuously tested and retested under different conditions  to make sure that they are applicable in multiple situations Cumulative – research joins the greater body of literature for an academic field; it does  not stand alone Empirical – every scientific finding can be measured or verified in some way Public – research is shared with everyone; not only for the person who does the  research Scientific Method – Observe, Develop Theoretical Explanations, Verify and test Tools of Science Concepts An abstract idea used to connect related observations Ex. Love Constructs Combination of concepts created for a specific situation Taking two abstract ideas and putting them together Ex. Romantic Behavior
Background image of page 2
Operational Definitions Behaviors and procedures to measure a concept Enables a concept to be studied by giving scientists a concrete example of the concept 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/19/2012 for the course COMM 341 taught by Professor Johnson during the Fall '11 term at University of Delaware.

Page1 / 18

exam 1 study guide - Exam 1 Study Guide 19:29 What is a...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online