Session 9 - English for Academic Studies (Workshop)...

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English for Academic Studies (Workshop) Session 9: Common ESL Errors I Semester 1, 2011/12 ©PolyU HKCC 1 Session 9: Common ESL Errors I (Subject-Verb Agreement) Part A: Diagnostic Test Some sentences below have a problem of disagreement between the subject and the verb. Identify the mistake and write the correct verb form in the space provided. Put a “√” if no mistake is found. While technological advancement have greatly widened the 1 communication channels around the globe, removing national, political 2 and economic boundaries, it do not necessarily bring people closer. With 3 more communication pathways, communication between people do not 4 appear to be more effective. 5 Part B: Key Points Review (Subject-verb agreement) Basic principle: In English, the number of the subject must correspond with the verb form. Put simply, singular subjects take singular verbs; plural subjects take plural verbs. REMEMBER THE FOLLOWING RULES WHEN YOU WRITE: SUBJECT-VERB SEPARATION . When the verb is not immediately preceded by the subject, make sure the verb agrees with the subject, not the intervening nouns and/or prepositional phrases, of the sentence. For example, the girl in red pants is my younger sister. SUBJECT-VERB INVERSION . In questions and in inverted sentences like those starting with Here and There , the verb agrees with the subject that follows. For example, there are over 15 tutorial schools in our neighborhood. COMPOUND SUBJECT (1) . Plural verbs are needed where two subjects are conjoined by And. For example, meanness and selfishness are qualities that repel most people.
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English for Academic Studies (Workshop) Session 9: Common ESL Errors I Semester 1, 2011/12 ©PolyU HKCC 2 COMPOUND SUBJECT (2) . When two subjects are joined by Either…Or , Neither…Nor , the verb agrees with the nearest subject. For example, either Jack or I am responsible for chairing the coming marketing meeting.
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This note was uploaded on 03/17/2012 for the course COMP 3868 taught by Professor Keithchan during the Winter '97 term at Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

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Session 9 - English for Academic Studies (Workshop)...

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