Lecture 1 Introduction - CC2002CreativeandCriticalThinking...

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03/17/12 1 CC2002 Creative and Critical Thinking 創創創創創創創 Semester One 11/12 Lecture One: Introduction
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03/17/12 2 Before we get things started… Your Lecturer:  KC Wong Office:  HHB 1514 Phone:  3746-0126 Email:  [email protected] Consultation Hours :  Mon 10:00-11:00, Tue 09:30-10:30 Group Discussion with prior appointment is most  welcome.
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03/17/12 3 What is thinking ( 創創 )? Think  (v):  “… make a mental effort to consider something …”   (The Collins Cobuild Dictionary) In Chinese:  創創 How often have you been asked to think more clearly and  rationally?  But did anyone tell you how to do so? Thinking  is a mental activity which exhibits: Active control Direction/ with purpose Procedural (i.e. rule -following) 
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03/17/12 4 What is Critical Thinking ( 創創創創 )? Critical Thinking is  the general term given to a  wide range of cognitive  skills ( 創創 )and intellectual  dispositions ( 創創 )needed to effectively identify,  analyse, and evaluate arguments and truth  claims, to discover and overcome personal  prejudices and biases, to formulate and present  convincing reasons in support of conclusions,  and to make reasonable, intelligent decisions  about what to believe and what to do.    From G. Bassham et al,  Critical Thinking: A Student Introduction, p.1.
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03/17/12 5 Who needs Critical Thinking Not just for Philosophers Not just for Logicians Not just for Academics Not just for Criticizing or Destructing Positions For Everyone For Establishing and Strengthening Positions  too.
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03/17/12 6 Framework of Thinking 1. 創創創創 (Linguistic-Conceptual analysis) 2. 創創創創 (Concepts of logic) 3. 創創創創 (Scientific reasoning) 4. 創創創創 (Fallacy analysis) 5. 創創創創 (Creative thinking)
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03/17/12 7 Linguistic-Conceptual Analysis ( 語語語語 ) We should first clarify the  meaning  of the  key  notions and  words in the statement before we evaluate the truth or  falsity of the statement. 創創創創創 關關 創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創 語語 創創 創創創 創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創創   Examples of language traps
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8 Why should we evaluate the meaning first?   Many of the problematic statements are  meaningless, and can t even be taken as false. 創創創創創創創創創創創
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This note was uploaded on 03/17/2012 for the course COMP 3868 taught by Professor Keithchan during the Spring '97 term at Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

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Lecture 1 Introduction - CC2002CreativeandCriticalThinking...

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