eHandout 3 - On Virtue Ethics

eHandout 3 - On Virtue Ethics - No. 3 eHandout Business...

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e Handout No. 3 Dr. David E. McClean On Virtue Ethics What follows was prepared by Dr. Jan Garrett (Western Kentucky University Retired). A summary of a number of topics in normative ethics may be found at Dr. Garrett’s site: http://www.wku.edu/~jan.garrett/350/350ethry.htm . I recommend that you visit it. It is a very “student friendly” collection of useful summaries. --------- Virtue ethics is an approach that deemphasizes rules, consequences and particular acts and places the focus on the kind of person who is acting. The issue is not primarily whether an intention is right, though that is important; nor is it primarily whether one is following the correct rule; nor is it primarily whether the consequences of action are good, though these factors are not irrelevant. What is primary is whether the person acting is expressing good character (moral virtues) or not. A person's character is the totality of his character traits. Our character traits can be good, bad or somewhere in between. They can be admirable or not. The admirable character traits, the marks of perfection in character, are called virtues, their opposites are vices. Character traits are: 1) dispositions or habit-like tendencies that are deeply entrenched or engrained. They have been referred to as second nature--"first nature" referring to tendencies with which we are born. Character traits are not innate--we were not born with them. Thus infants are neither virtuous nor vicious.
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eHandout 3 - On Virtue Ethics - No. 3 eHandout Business...

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