06a Greek Democracy and Science 12411

06a Greek Democracy and Science 12411 - Greek Democracy and...

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Greek  Democracy  and Science
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The “Archaic Period” After the “Dark Age”  of Greek history The city-state or  polis   emerged as the  principal form of  government Diversity in type of  government and  emphasis or focus the  the city-state
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City-States Curse Local pride became  bitter jealousy, so there was  almost constant war  between the city-states. Benefit Kept the government at  a local level so creativity in  politics, philosophy, and  other areas could flourish. City-state areas
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Sparta Military-based culture  (army)  Seven year old boys  taken to learn military  skills.  Military obligation  ended at age 60.  Women focused on  bearing sons. Mediterranean Sea Militaristic/Traditional City- State
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Militaristic/Traditional City- State Sparta No art. Militaristic culture  continued until the  end of the Greek  Golden Age (350 BC). Mediterranean Sea Military-based culture  (army)  (cont.)
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Phalanx Spears
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Intellectual/Artistic City-State Athens Trade-based culture Focused on individualism  rather than collective  behavior Strongly supported the  arts and sciences Experimented with  government systems Trade and navy became  keys to success
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Rule of Law Draco (621 BC) Tyrant of Athens Laws were harsh (“draconian”)  but logical. Exhibiting the laws publicly  was a step to insure universal  application.
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2012 for the course MFG 201 taught by Professor Terry,r during the Fall '08 term at BYU.

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06a Greek Democracy and Science 12411 - Greek Democracy and...

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