MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF HEAT TRANSFER OF

MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF HEAT TRANSFER OF -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF HEAT TRANSFER OF CARBON NANOTUBES J. Shiomi, Y. Igarashi, Y. Taniguchi and S. Maruyama Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, JAPAN Several heat transfer problems related to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are considered using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The Brenner potential [1] with the simplified form [2] is employed as the potential function between carbon and carbon within a nanotube. MD simulations of thermal conductivity along a nanotube, isotope effect in longitudinal thermal conductivity, and thermal boundary resistance in a junction of nanotubes are reviewed. Then, the heat transfer from an SWNT to various surrounding materials is simulated by MD simulations. Heat transfers between nanotubes in a bundle of nanotubes and between a nanotube and water are considered. The heat transfer rate can be well expressed by employing the thermal boundary resistance (TBR). The value of thermal boundary resistance is compared for nanotube-junction, bundle, and water-nanotubes cases. HEAT CONDUCTIVITY OF SWNTs In our previous reports [3-6], thermal conductivity was calculated from the measured temperature gradient and the heat flux obtained by the energy budgets of phantom molecules. Combined with the temperature gradient, the thermal conductivity λ can be calculated through the Fourier’s equation. Although the thermal conductivity for a finite length nanotube was calculated to be lower than the previously reported result (6600 W/mK at 300 K [7]), the thermal conductivity is much higher than highly thermal-conductive metals. The dependence of the thermal conductivity on the nanotube length [5] is summarized in Fig. 1. The thermal conductivity was diverging with the power-law of the nanotube length [4, 5] at least up to the 0.4 µ
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/18/2012 for the course PHYSICS 303 taught by Professor Ihn during the Spring '12 term at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich.

Page1 / 3

MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF HEAT TRANSFER OF -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online