Lecture 6 - Area

Lecture 6 - Area - Chapter 6 Three structural factors of...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 6 Three structural factors of screen space Aspect Ratio Object Size Image Size Aspect ratio is the relationship of screen width to screen height. Painters and photographers have free choice of orientation of their works. In TV, Film, and on computer displays, we dont have many options. We are restricted by the area within the screen, no matter what area that is. Horizontal Orientation TV, film, and computer screens are horizontally oriented. We live and operate in a horizontal plane. In our everyday lives, we perceive the world as flat. Gravity allows us to walk upright and move in our horizontal environment, but going vertical takes more work Our peripheral vision is greater than vertical Standard Ratios Early motion pictures had a 4 x 3 aspect ratio, but soon, TV and computer monitors assumed the format. More precisely, the standard aspect ratio is 1.33:1; for every 1 unit high, there are 1.33 units across. HDTV screens have a widescreen ratio of 1.78:1, or 16 x 9, not quite the same as the standard motion picture format of 1.85:1 (16.65 x 9). There is one more format, called Cinemascope or Panavision 35, that has a 2.35:1 ratio (21.15 x 9). Framing The 4 x 3 aspect ratio does not emphasize the difference between width and height. It makes framing simple: A horizontally oriented scene doesnt have too much wasted vertical space. A vertically oriented scene wont have too much empty space on the sides. Close-ups and extreme close-ups work very well. Framing The 16 x 9 aspect ratio demands more attention to elements on the sides of your shots than 4 x 3. Establishing long shots work very well, but then when going to close ups, much of the surrounding action is in view. In close-ups, the empty space around is called the deadzone This requires all extras to be very believable, but unobtrusive at the same time. Framing - Standard vs. Widescreen. Why did the film industry eventually adopt the widescreen aspect ratio? At first, competition with television was reason enough, as well as the ability to use the large screen to engulf us in spectacle. Framing in the widescreen formats of film are especially effective for landscape shots: Framing But directors have learned to use the format effectively for close-up and intimate scenes as well, and are able to transition between huge landscape scenes and detailed,...
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Lecture 6 - Area - Chapter 6 Three structural factors of...

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