Lecture 9 - Depth Volume Sophie(1)

Lecture 9 - Depth Volume Sophie(1) - Chapter 9 The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 9 The Three-Dimensional Field: Depth and Volume
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
TV and film require us to project a 3-D world onto a 2-D surface. The camera and our eyes allow this projection to happen in a believable way. The key is what the camera sees, not what you see. The 3-D field covers the z-axis , graphic depth factors , and the depth characteristics of lenses .
Background image of page 2
The Z-axis The x-axis and the y-axis define the width and the height of a 2-D plane, like a television screen. The z axis describes depth.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Z-axis It is an imaginary line that extends from the front of the camera lens to the horizon. Used to help create the illusion of depth, that extends from the front of the camera lens to the horizon. Important because TV is two dimensional and can help add depth.
Background image of page 4
The Z-axis
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Graphic Depth Factors There are 5 factors that contribute to creating the illusion of depth on the 2-D plane: Overlapping planes Relative size Height in plane Linear perspective Aerial perspective
Background image of page 6
Graphic Depth Factors: Overlapping Planes Overlapping planes Use the foreground to force viewer to focus on object in background. You have one object in front overlapping another object in the background creating the illusion of depth.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Graphic Depth Factors: Relative Size Relative size If you know how big an object is or if you can guess its size by other clues, you can estimate its distance from the camera by its relative size. If you have two objects that are similar in size, and one appears smaller than the other on screen, you will perceive the smaller object as farther away.
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Graphic Depth Factors
Background image of page 12
Graphic Depth Factors: Height in Plane Height in plane If the camera is shooting parallel to the ground, an object will appear more distant the higher it moves up in the picture field (until it reaches the horizon line). This depth cue is not the most reliable, because the mobility of the camera causes the horizon line to constantly shift.
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 14
Linear perspective Linear perspective perceptions: All objects look progressively smaller the farther away they are. Parallel lines converge in the distance; vertical
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/18/2012 for the course RTV 3001 taught by Professor Sharuti during the Spring '12 term at FSU.

Page1 / 41

Lecture 9 - Depth Volume Sophie(1) - Chapter 9 The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 16. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online