Lecture 12 - Time

Lecture 12 - Time - Chapter 12 Television and film require...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 12 Television and film require that we work with not only a spatial field, but a space/time field as well. Vectors include a time element. Vector fields are not static, but are constantly changing within a shot or from shot to shot. The four-dimensional field has basic elements: the theories and modes of time and motion. Time in TV and film can be described as a horizontal time vector. Time moves from past, through the present, to the future. As media practitioners, we can influence our audience’s time perceptions by controlling subjective time. The past and future are objective, the present is subjective. Event density (starts on p. 232) The number of event details that occur within a brief period of clock time is event density. A high-energy event will be very dense, with many things happening. A low-energy event will not be so dense. A movie or TV sequence with many brief shots, shifts in point-of-view is a high-density event – the “Island” clip we watched. Commercials are especially dense, because they have to give a large amount of information in a short period of time. Coke’s Happiness Factory Event intensity Some events seem to carry more energy than others. A stampeding herd of cattle would have more energy than a single cow grazing. A high energy event will involve us more than a low energy event. Action movies thrive on high energy events and are plot driven. Dramas are character driven, and they derive their energy and intensity from the character’s feelings and actions. Experience intensity Defined as the number of relevant experiences we go...
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This note was uploaded on 03/18/2012 for the course RTV 3001 taught by Professor Sharuti during the Spring '12 term at FSU.

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Lecture 12 - Time - Chapter 12 Television and film require...

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