WrittenAssignment3_ENS-314_RaymondMilek

WrittenAssignment3_ENS-314_RaymondMilek - Thomas Edison...

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Thomas Edison State College Raymond Milek-SID#0483682 ENS-314-OL009 Global Environmental Science Prof. Neil Pearce January, 2012 Semester 2/24/2012 Written Assignment 3 1) There are several points of view concerning the importance of maintaining biological diversity. For example, environmental groups in the Northwest want to restrict logging to save the habitat of an endangered bird. Timber companies insist that the well-being of one bird type is not as important as the well- being of the population who will be affected if the restriction causes the companies to lay off workers. How do you respond to these arguments? Is there a possible compromise? (LO 3.1) For as long as man has been able to build homes and other structures out of wood, certain species have faced the risk of losing their habitats. In the Pacific Northwest, for example, the northern spotted owl is now facing extinction and loss of a habitat due to the increased logging in the forests this owl calls home (Andre and Velasquez). Ironically, in these 200-year- old forests, the owl actually lived off of the decaying timber and plant life, and made its home in the cavities of old trunks (Andre and Velasquez). In this particular area, logging has been going on for 150 years. Consequently, only 10% of these forests remain, and only 4,000 of these owls are estimated to still be 1
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in existence (Andre and Velasquez). At this rate, the owl will more than likely be extinct in the decades to come. I do not have a reasonable response or solution to these problems. The building of homes will need to continue as long as people come to this country and the already existing population procreates. In order to build homes, logging and the destruction of forests is necessary to obtain wood. What possible compromise could be made to reduce the extinction of any species? One solution is to possibly enact a law that allows only a certain part of any forest or wooded area to be used for logging. Of course, if these areas are purchased by a private individual or organization, then can anyone interfere with what the land owner decides to do with their property? The EPA, along with other federal laws can make sure that the destruction of our nation’s wooded areas is kept to a minimum. Possibly, a law stating that any land purchased from the date of enactment, and from then on, can only be used to a certain extent. Another possible compromise would be to label certain areas as “preserved forever”, as we see often (as of recent) in New Jersey. The problem is whether or not this can actually happen. As long as large corporations are making huge profits from the woodlands, they will continue to pay heavy taxes on these profits. Big business in America seems to always trump what is right or what is important. The almighty dollar speaks louder 2
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than any protest or organization. While biodiversity researchers project that by the end of this century the extinction rate will rise to 10,000 times the background rate, or 1% of all wild
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WrittenAssignment3_ENS-314_RaymondMilek - Thomas Edison...

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