WrittenAssignment4_ENS-314_RaymondMilek

WrittenAssignment4_ENS-314_RaymondMilek - Thomas Edison...

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Thomas Edison State College Raymond Milek-SID#0483682 ENS-314-OL009 Global Environmental Science Prof. Neil Pearce January, 2012 Semester 3/5/2012 Written Assignment 4 1. What are the implications of finite mineral supplies? How should we address impending shortages? (LO 4.1) Finite mineral supplies are inevitably on the brink of depletion. Some nonrenewable minerals are on the verge of economic depletion. Although more than half of nonrenewable minerals are recycled by means of municipal recycling programs, scrap metal recyclers, etc. (Batey Blackman), the prospect of impending shortages is definitely in sight. There are, however, some interesting notions that finite minerals can actually increase. These notions are based on expansion of the effective stock of resources (Batey Blackman). The effective stock notion is based on the fact that the world of mining has technologically grown, just as every other aspect of industrialism, since the industrial revolution (Batey Blackman). Batey Blackman states that the three ways effective stocks can expand resources are by the innovation of a way to preserve mineral wasted or lost during mining and smelting, 1
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substituting for the minerals normally used by the average person, and by advanced changes in recycling (Batey Blackman). While these ideas are very possible, the question of whether or not they will occur faster than the depletion time of nonrenewable minerals is an issue. The implications of these finite minerals supplies cannot accurately be measured because the amount of these resources is truly unknown. Data on resource reserves do not actually tell if a resource is on the verge of depleting. One way to judge the scarcity of our nonrenewable resources is by its price. Other than that the amount of finite, nonrenewable resources has no way to be gauged. 2. What is your opinion regarding the use of nuclear power as a source of energy? Describe the process involved in the nuclear reaction and justify your position, citing advantages of and disadvantages of the use of nuclear power. (LO 4). Nuclear power is a source of energy that has not lived up to its expectations. It is a costly process, which may potentially require more energy to store and dismantle at the end of its life cycle than it will ever produce (Miller and Spoolman, 386). Furthermore, nuclear energy loses far more during the ore and nuclear reactor process than it ever produces. While nuclear energy seems to be less harmful to the 2
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environment, it is a costly and ineffective way of producing energy. The process involved in a nuclear reaction takes place in a nuclear reactor. A simple way to describe the process is by using a simile for the uranium isotope. The uranium isotope can be thought of as a sticky lollipop. A highly receptive uranium isotope (just an atom with extra neutrons) acts like a sticky “lollipop” (Brain). When another neutron comes close by and sticks to the “lollipop”, it breaks apart, releasing large amounts of energy. It also releases more neutrons, which when
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This note was uploaded on 03/18/2012 for the course ENS 114 taught by Professor ?? during the Spring '12 term at Thomas Edison State.

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WrittenAssignment4_ENS-314_RaymondMilek - Thomas Edison...

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