INSTRUCTIONS - Are essential to technical communication Are...

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Unformatted text preview: Are essential to technical communication Are written more than any other technical document Must be written carefully for safe practices Are essentially technical descriptions geared toward helping something complete a specific task Can become a liability issue Are challenging to write Must make sure the audience wants to read them Must be easily read and understood Must make sure that when performing the tasks readers won’t damage equipment, injure themselves or other people Analyze audience & purpose Gather and organize information Design the document Draft the document Revise, edit and proofread the document Test the document ◦ When instructions are ineffective, most likely the writer has inaccurately assessed the audience. ◦ Think carefully about the background and skill level of your audience. ◦ Also consider the language skills of the audience. ◦ Utilize usability testing to help ensure success for the intended audience. What do your readers expect? Do you need multiple instructions for multiple audiences? What language should you use? Will the reading environment impact the document design? Should you make your pages multilingual? If so, should you use simultaneous or sequential design? Will readers be anxious about using the information? If so, make the design open with lots of white space and graphics If the environment is an issue, consider font size and layout Clearly relate graphics to text Write clear safety information ◦ Be clear and concise ◦ Avoid complicated sentences ◦ Sometimes phrases are more direct than sentences. ◦ EX: “Safety glasses required” ANSI (American National Standards Institute): ◦ Danger-means an immediate and serious hazard that will likely be fatal. (RED) DANGER: EXTREMELY HIGH VOLTAGE. STAND BACK....
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This note was uploaded on 03/23/2012 for the course ITEC 3290 taught by Professor Dunn during the Spring '12 term at East Carolina University .

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INSTRUCTIONS - Are essential to technical communication Are...

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