game theory IDS - A Game Theoretic Formulation for...

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Unformatted text preview: A Game Theoretic Formulation for Intrusion Detection in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks * Animesh Patcha and Jung-Min Park Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Blacksburg, VA 24061 Abstract Nodes in a mobile ad hoc network need to thwart various attacks and ma- licious activities. This is especially true for the ad hoc environment where there is a total lack of centralized or third-party authentication and security architectures. This paper presents a game-theoretic model to analyze intrusion detection in mobile ad hoc networks. We use game theory to model the in- teractions between the nodes of an ad hoc network. We view the interaction between an attacker and an individual node as a two player non-cooperative game, and construct models for such a game. Keywords Intrusion Detection, Mobile Ad hoc Networks, Game Theory * A preliminary version of portions of this material was presented at the Fifth Annual IEEE Information Assurance Workshop, United States Military Academy, West Point, New York, June 2004. 1 1 Introduction In the past couple of years, considerable interest has developed in creating new kinds of network applications that fully exploit distributed mobile computing, particularly for military and defence purposes. The key underlying technology for such applications is the mobile ad hoc network (MANET). MANETs, as the name suggests, have no supporting infrastructure. They are autonomous distributed systems that are comprised of a number of mobile nodes connected by wireless links, forming arbitrary time-varying wireless network topolo- gies. Mobile nodes function both as hosts and routers. As hosts, they represent source and destination nodes in the network, while as routers, they represent intermediate nodes between a source and a destination, providing store-and-forward services to neighboring nodes. Store-and-forward services are needed due to the limited range of each individual mobile host’s wireless transmission. Nodes that constitute the wireless network infrastructure are free to move randomly and organize themselves arbitrarily. Applications such as military exercises and disaster relief will benefit from ad hoc networking, but secure and reliable communication is a necessary prerequisite for such applications. Flexibility and adaptability, which are the strengths of MANET, are unfortunately accompanied by increased security risks. Security in the MANET environment is particularly difficult to achieve, notably because of the limited physical protection to each of the nodes, the sporadic nature of connectivity, the absence of a certification authority, and the lack of a centralized monitoring or management unit. Intrusion prevention is not guaranteed to work all the time, and this clearly underscores the need for intrusion detection as a front–line security research area under the umbrella of ad hoc network security. In traditional wireless networks, mobile devices associateof ad hoc network security....
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game theory IDS - A Game Theoretic Formulation for...

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