Chapter 16 (2)

Chapter 16(2) - /9/09 Morphology and species Morphological traits may not be useful in distinguishing species o Members of the same species may

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Chapter 16 11/9/09 Morphology and species Morphological traits may not be useful in distinguishing species o Members of the same species may appear different because of environmental conditions o Morphology can vary with age and sex o Different species can appear indentical What is a Species? Species – Latin for “appearance” Biological – species concept (BSC) o Groups of actually or potentially interbreeding natural populations, which are reproductively isolated o Concept very useful for organisms that reproduce sexually (i.e., animals, plants, fungi) Problems with BSC What about asexually reproducing organisms (e.g., bacteria, archea, protists) o What about fossil species? o Morphology is all you have There are currently 7 species concepts recognized by biologists, but BSC is generally accepted Fruit fly species all look more or less alike. If you have a male and female fruit fly, how can you show that they are the same species? If they mate successfully, and their offspring can also mate successfully, they are the same species. How Do Species Form?
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2012 for the course BIOL 1001 taught by Professor Minor during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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Chapter 16(2) - /9/09 Morphology and species Morphological traits may not be useful in distinguishing species o Members of the same species may

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