wig ship - SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING MECH ENG 3016...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING MECH. ENG. 3016 AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING I Wing in Ground Effect (WIG) aircraft Aerodynamics Leon Bennett Alexander Frank Thomas McLoughlin Richard Moreton Samuel Randell Seng Wong
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Wing In Ground Effect (WIG) Craft 2 Project assessment Date and signature Name Signature Date 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Group mark (please do not write anything in the table below) Criteria Mark (total 100) 1. Project definition /5 2. Research activities /15 3. Group discussion board activity /20 4. Format of the report /10 5. Quality of the presentation /20 6. Completeness /10 7. Handling the questions /20 Project mark (please do not write anything in the table below) Group member Group mark (50% x project mark) Individual mark (50% x project mark) Project mark (Total 100) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
Image of page 2
Wing In Ground Effect (WIG) Craft 3 Executive Summary The wing in ground (WIG) effect has effectively been known to aviators for as long as man made aircraft have existed. The WIG effect is a phenomenon that creates an increase in lift experienced by an aircraft as it approaches the ground for landing, when vortices of air become trapped between the wings of the aircraft and the ground creating a cushion effect. An inherent danger of this effect is that the additional lift can change the angle of attack of a landing craft, causing longitudinal (pitch) instability. If not properly corrected (e.g. in the hands of an inexperienced pilot), the potential exists for stall to occur, which could result in the aircraft crashing with possible casualties. The ground effect is widely seen as a good thing, and most aircraft can benefit from the ground effect in the form of a better landing (helicopters are affected by the ground effect as well). The additional lift provided by the ground effect reduces demand on the engines of an aircraft and power needed in order to stay airborne, thus making it more efficient. The knowledge that ground effect flight is more efficient than traditional flight has lead people to develop craft that exploit this benefit by being designed to fly close to the ground. Development of WIG craft spans roughly over the past 50 years, ranging from small scale recreational craft, to large scale military craft, yet such craft have not become successful mainstream products. This is largely due to the limitations present in existing WIG craft designs, such as the high maintenance nature of having exposed engines in close proximity to the sea, which reduces reliability. Such factors have previously lead to a withdrawal of military funding for research and development in this area, across all major countries that were once rigorously involved in this research. Despite this, the potential still exists for WIG craft design to achieve the functionality required to become successful in niche areas such as high speed transport rather than warfare.
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Wing In Ground Effect (WIG) Craft 4 CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................. 5 2. HISTORY ................................................................................................................................ 6 3. THEORY ............................................................................................................................... 12 3.1. T HEORY OF F LIGHT ........................................................................................................ 13 3.1.1. Lift and Drag ............................................................................................................. 13 3.1.2. Downwash ................................................................................................................. 14 3.1.3. Geometry ................................................................................................................... 14 3.2. G ROUND E FFECT ............................................................................................................ 15 3.3. P ITCHING M OMENT ........................................................................................................ 17 3.4. M
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern