Lab Report Martin Suhartono - Year 2010 Month 9 Day 14...

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Unformatted text preview: Year 2010 Month 9 Day 14 BALANCE CALIBRATION MAE 309 Aerospace Engineering Laboratory II Name: Martin Suhartono ID: 20106182 MAE 309 Balance Calibration Page 2 1. Introduction and Background In this particular experiment, we will deal with calibration. Calibration in general sense is a comparison between two measurements, one obtained through experiments with one known as the standard. Calibration plays a significant role in ensuring not only the quality and reliability of an instrument but also the accurate design of the instrument. Subsequent action taken after the calibration is the adjustment of the tested instrument to produce the standard result in a certain degree of accuracy. Thus, the quality of the calibration process is also important to ensure accurate evaluation of the instrument. In our case, the calibration will be applied on the experimental results for drag and lift forces acting on bending beams. We will use mass to generate the lift and frag forces. The forces, on the other hand, are sensed by load cells whose strain gauges will experience strain deformation due to the forces. These sensors will then transform the deformation to electrical signals which will then be amplified and registered in a computer. The experimental results will then be compared with the theoretical results, functioning as the standard, to grade the quality of the calibration for our experiment. Theoretically, when a loading beam is subjected to purely vertical force, the lift should increases proportionally with mass while the drag force should remain zero. In contrast, a pure horizontal force exerted on the loading beam will incur a drag force that is linearly proportional with mass and lift that remains zero. Hence we will expect the plotted lift and drag graphs for vertical and horizontal forces, respectively, to cross the origin. On the other hand, the drag and lift graphs for the vertical and horizontal forces respectively should be straight lines. 2. Materials and Methodology Materials: a. 2 bending beam load cells b. 4 masses c. electronic balance d. a pulley system Methods: a. Weigh the 4 masses and note their weights accordingly. b. Load one of the masses on to the pulley system to generate either a lift or drag. c. Note down the voltage generated. d. Keep increasing the force acting on the loading beam by adding the masses to the pulley system one after another. e. Note down the voltage generated for every increase in the mass. f. Unload the masses one after another and note down the corresponding voltage generated for every decrease in the mass. g. Repeat steps b to f for the other type of force. MAE 309 Balance Calibration Page 3 3. Results and Discussion 3.1. Mass measurement Mass of weights (g) 1 2 3 4 5 499.58 999.14 999.2 999.19 999.01 3.2. Drag Force Data 7 8 9 Mean Variance Standard deviation Vx Vz Vx Vz Vx Vz Vx Vz Vx Vz Vx Vz 0.111 0.295 0.111 0.295 0.111 0.295 0.111 0.294 1.94E-07 1.00E-06 4.41E-04 1.00E-03 0.205 0.295 0.207 0.295 0....
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Lab Report Martin Suhartono - Year 2010 Month 9 Day 14...

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