Understanding Iconography

Understanding Iconography -...

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Unformatted text preview: qwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopa sdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxc vbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwerty uiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghj klzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmq wertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopas dfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcv bnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyu iopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjkl zxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqw Understanding Iconography Tanita D. Wright 1/29/2012 Art/101 Jamie Yahr The Adoration of the Lamb: The Vision of Ezekiel: The chosen pieces of artwork were The Adoration of the Lamb, painted by Hubert and Jan van Eyck on the wall of a church in Ghent in 1432 and the Vision of Ezekiel, which was painted by Raphael in 1518. Both are laden with symbolism and adhere to the four principles in chapter 1. The first role of an artist is to help the people see the world in an innovative way (Sayre, 2009). Hubert achieves this through his representation and symbolism. Also he captures a visual record of the time with the subject matter, as there were prevalent Christian themes during...
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Understanding Iconography -...

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