Annotated Bio-final version

Annotated Bio-final version - Brennan Woods Dr White...

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Brennan Woods Dr. White History 112-04 April 20, 2010 Enslavement in America Broker, Robert M. Clarke Commission Merchant & Negro. Slave Receipt. Slave recepipt, Atlata, Georgia: Robert M. Clarke Commission Merchant & Negro Broker, 1902. Slaves were often bought as property. The document shows how the act of buying and selling was a business and was done by professional negro brokers. The receipt shows two nergros in exahnge for $2,950. (from: http://www.willishenry.com/slave%20receipt.jpg .) Douglas, Frederick. Speech to the American Anti-Slavery Society. 1865. Congress approved the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery in February, 1865, and the Union’s final military victory over the Confederacy that spring assured the destruction of the slave system. After the war The American Anti-Slavery Society and other abolitionist leaders met on May 5, 1865. During the meeting Frederick Douglass addressed the Society, urging it not to disband but to continue the fight against racial discrimination and civil rights. (from: Exploring American History. " Speech to the American Anti-Slavery Society ," 1865. LaserD . CD-ROM. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Disclosure, 2006.) Dred Scott v. Sandford. 393 (The Surpreme Court, March 6, 1857). Although several slaves had previously sued for freedom, Dred Scott v. Sandford, or the Dred Scott decision, is by far the most famous case. The crux of the case was that Scott, a slave, had been taken to a slave-free territory by his master, and thus, being technically free, was always free. Scott later sued for his freedom on this basis. The court ruled that Scott was not a citizen, and thus had no right to sue.
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