POLS 206 32911

POLS 206 - POLS 206 The Congressional Process-Party Constituency and Ideology-Party Influence-Party leaders cannot force party members to vote a

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POLS 206 3/29/11 The Congressional Process -Party, Constituency, and Ideology -Party Influence: -Party leaders cannot force party members to vote a particular way, but many do vote along party lines -Constituency verses Ideology -Prime determinant of member’s vote on most issues is ideology -On most issues that are not salient, legislators may ignore constituency opinion -But on controversial issues, members are wise to heed constituent opinion -Lobbyists and Interest Groups -There are 35,000 registered lobbyists trying to influence Congress-the bigger the issue, the more lobbyists will be working on it -Lobbyists try to influence legislators’ votes. -Lobbyists can be ignored, shunned and even regulated by Congress -Ultimately, it is a combination of lobbyists and others that influence legislatures’ votes Understanding Congress -Congress and Democracy -Leadership and committee assignments are not representative -Congress does try to respond to what the people want, but some argue it could do a better job
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This note was uploaded on 03/21/2012 for the course POLS 206 taught by Professor Someonethatwasjusttryingtogettheirdoctorate during the Spring '06 term at Texas A&M.

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POLS 206 - POLS 206 The Congressional Process-Party Constituency and Ideology-Party Influence-Party leaders cannot force party members to vote a

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