Homework_05

Homework_05 - water inside rose to point B, determine the...

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CEEN 641 – ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT #5 1. For the theoretical soil profile shown, determine the total stress, pore pressure, and effective stress for points A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H. The water table is at the top of the sand layer. Assume hydrostatic water conditions. Plot these three parameters as a function of depth. (NTS) Layer #1 4 ft SAND γ m (pcf) = 117.0 Layer #2 Sandy SILT G s = 2.68 γ dry (pcf) = 3 ft (Extent of w = 0.12 γ m (pcf) = Capillary Rise) S = 0.46 γ sat (pcf) = e = Layer #2 1 ft Sandy SILT G s = 2.68 γ dry (pcf) = w = 0.23 γ m (pcf) = 2 ft S = 0.88 γ sat (pcf) = e = Layer #3 SAND G s = 2.66 γ dry (pcf) = 3 ft w = 0.2 γ m (pcf) = γ sat (pcf) = 2 ft Layer #4 CLAY G s = 2.7 γ dry (pcf) = 4 ft w = 0.31 γ m (pcf) = γ sat (pcf) = 120.0 Point D Point H Point B Point C Point F Point E Point A Point G 2. Reconsidering the previous problem, if an open standpipe were installed at point G, and the
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Unformatted text preview: water inside rose to point B, determine the total stress, pore pressure, and effective stress at points F, G and H. Also determine the hydraulic gradient in the clay layer and comment on any importance its value might have. Assume that the sand layer on top of the clay layer serves as a free drainage boundary. 3. Given the glass capillary tube arrangement shown below, determine the distance from the initial water level surface to the bottom of the meniscus in the tubes if (1) the tubes are initially filled with air and if (2) the tubes are initially filled with water. Briefly explain how you reached your answers. Height = 12 cm Dia. = 0.1 mm Height = 10.0 cm Dia. = 0.4 mm Height = 8 cm Dia. = 0.1 mm (NTS)...
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2012 for the course CEEN 641 taught by Professor Travisgerber during the Fall '10 term at BYU.

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