Homework_21

Homework_21 - active horizontal stresses (not coefficients)...

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CEEN 641 – ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT #21 1. A 5.5-ft high abutment wall retains a densely compacted, moist (not saturated) sandy soil. The wall face is vertical and the top of the backfill is level. The soil has a unit weight of 117 pcf, a friction angle of 40 degrees, and a cohesion of zero. Assume an interface friction angle of 30 degrees as needed (although this value may not yield realistic results). Determine the following: A. the Rankine coefficient for active earth pressure conditions and the corresponding horizontal stress at the bottom of the wall B. the Rankine coefficient for passive earth pressure conditions and the corresponding horizontal stress at the bottom of the wall C. the Coulomb coefficient for active earth pressure conditions and the corresponding horizontal stress at the bottom of the wall; also compute the ratio of Coulomb to Rankine
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Unformatted text preview: active horizontal stresses (not coefficients) D. the Coulomb coefficient for passive earth pressure conditions and the corresponding horizontal stress at the bottom of the wall ; also compute the ratio of Coulomb to Rankine passive horizontal stresses (not coefficients). You are encouraged to check your results by referring to published tables of earth pressure coefficients. 2. Plot the stress states as Mohrs circles corresponding to Parts B and D from the previous problem. Plot both circles on the same axes and include the soil-friction and interface-friction envelopes. Comment on the differences you observe. You may wish to save a copy of this assignment for reference when completing the next homework assignment....
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2012 for the course CEEN 641 taught by Professor Travisgerber during the Fall '10 term at BYU.

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