Ch10_Outline - Chapter 10 The Restless Ocean Ocean Water Movements Surface circulation Ocean currents are masses of water that flow from one place

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 Chapter 10  The Restless Ocean
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    Ocean Water Movements  Surface circulation   Ocean currents  are masses of water  that flow from one place to another  Surface currents  develop from friction  between the ocean and the wind that  blows across the surface  Huge, slowly moving  gyres   
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    Ocean Water Movements  Surface circulation   Five main gyres  North Pacific Gyre  South Pacific Gyre North Atlantic Gyre South Atlantic Gyre Indian Ocean Gyre Related to atmospheric circulation  
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    Average Ocean Surface Currents in  February–March Figure 10.2
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    Ocean Water Movements  Surface circulation   Deflected by the  Coriolis effect   To the right in the Northern Hemisphere  To the left in the Southern Hemisphere  Four main currents generally exist  within each gyre  Importance of surface currents  Climate Currents from low latitudes into higher  latitudes  (warm currents)   transfer heat  from warmer to cooler areas 
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    Ocean Water Movements  Surface circulation   Importance of surface currents  Climate Influence of cold currents is most  pronounced in the tropics or during the  summer months in the middle latitudes  Upwelling   The rising of cold water from deeper  layers  Most characteristic along west coasts of  continents
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    Ocean Water Movements  Deep-ocean circulation   A response to density differences Factors creating a dense mass of water  Temperature—Cold water is dense Salinity—Density increases with increasing  salinity Called  thermohaline circulation     
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    Ocean Water Movements  Deep-ocean circulation  Most water involved in deep-ocean  currents begins in high latitudes at the  surface  A simplified model of ocean circulation  is similar to a conveyor belt that travels  from the Atlantic Ocean, through the  Indian and Pacific Oceans, and back  again 
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    Idealized “Conveyor Belt”  Model of Ocean Circulation Figure 10.6
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    Waves  Waves  Energy traveling along the interface  between ocean and atmosphere  Derive their energy and motion from  wind  Parts  Crest  Trough
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    Waves  Waves 
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This note was uploaded on 03/21/2012 for the course GEO 1013 taught by Professor Hefner during the Fall '07 term at The University of Texas at San Antonio- San Antonio.

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Ch10_Outline - Chapter 10 The Restless Ocean Ocean Water Movements Surface circulation Ocean currents are masses of water that flow from one place

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